Carrot River Mennonite Church (Carrot River, Saskatchewan, Canada)

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Carrot River Mennonite Church in 1999
Photo by Victor Wiebe

As early as 1925 Mennonite families started moving into the area south of what is now the Town of Carrot River. As their numbers grew, they began to meet in their homes for fellowship. Pastors from Winnipeg, southern Saskatchewan, and Lost River came to serve with sermons and perform baptisms, communion, and marriages.

In 1928 the building of a small church (26 by 30 feet), began; it was dedicated on 31 March 1929. This church became the Hoffnungsfeld Mennonite Church of Carrot River. In time, some of the original families moved their homesteads further north. Here, people started gathering in homes for Sunday School and worship. The process of building a church here began in 1934 and was dedicated in 1937 with Rev. Benjamin Ewert officiating, and Rev. Cornelius. C. Boschman, serving as a minister.

In the late 1950s, the Hoffnungsfeld Mennonite Church of Carrot River ("the South Church"), considered expansion. At the same time, the Petaigan Church ("the North Church"), was getting smaller and contemplated closing. The two churches decided to build a larger church in the Town of Carrot River. Work on this church started in 1959 and the Carrot River Mennonite Church was dedicated on Easter Monday, 1960.

Carrot River was one of the five local worshiping locations of the Hoffnungsfelder Gemeinde which included Rabbit Lake, Glenbush, Petaigan and Mayfair. They were received as members of the Conference of Mennonites in Canada in 1934.

In 1960 the congregation decided to leave the Hoffnungsfelder Gemeinde and become an independent congregation, named Grace Mennonite Church. Then in 1962, it changed its name again to Carrot River Mennonite Church.

In 2020 church programs included Children's Club, Youth Group, Sunday School, Bible Studies, and Koinonia Ladies Group. The language of worship is English; the transition from German occurred in the 1960s.

Bibliography

Canadian Mennonite (23 September 1955): 7; (29 April 1960): 1.

"Church history." Carrot River Mennonite Church. Web. 2 July 2021. https://www.crmennonitechurch.com/church-history.html.

Additional Information

Address: 2702 Poplar Ave., Box 567, Carrot River, Saskatchewan S0E 0L0

Phone: 306-768-2457

Website: https://www.crmennonitechurch.com/

Denominational Affiliations:

Mennonite Church Saskatchewan (1929-present)

Conference of Mennonites in Canada/Mennonite Church Canada (1934-present)

General Conference Mennonite Church (1953-1999)

Carrot River Mennonite Church Pastors

Name Year of Service
Cornelius Boschmann 1931-1933
1960-1969
Richard Friesen 1934-1946
David Dyck 1934-1942
Peter Epp 1944-1968
John Zacharias 1950-1968
John H. Wiebe 1961-1965
John F. Wiebe 1966-1968
Wally Zacharias 1965, 1976
Peter Peters 1969-1975
Irvin Schmidt 1977-1982
Abe Buhler 1983-1989
Frank Enns 1990-1991
Philip A. Gunther 1992-1999
Craig Hollands 2000-2005
Ed Cornelson (Interim) 2006-2007
Ben Pauls 2007-2012
Ken Bechtel (interim) 2012-2013
Daniel Janzen 2013-2019
Kevin Koop 2019-present

Carrot River Mennonite Church Membership

Year Members
1931 52
1950 100
1959 107
1965 132
1975 138
1985 142
1995 148
2000 160
2009 140
2020 135

Maps

Map:Carrot River Mennonite Church (Carrot River, Saskatchewan)


Author(s) Marlene Epp
Samuel J. Steiner
Date Published July 2021

Cite This Article

MLA style

Epp, Marlene and Samuel J. Steiner. "Carrot River Mennonite Church (Carrot River, Saskatchewan, Canada)." Global Anabaptist Mennonite Encyclopedia Online. July 2021. Web. 18 Oct 2021. https://gameo.org/index.php?title=Carrot_River_Mennonite_Church_(Carrot_River,_Saskatchewan,_Canada)&oldid=171890.

APA style

Epp, Marlene and Samuel J. Steiner. (July 2021). Carrot River Mennonite Church (Carrot River, Saskatchewan, Canada). Global Anabaptist Mennonite Encyclopedia Online. Retrieved 18 October 2021, from https://gameo.org/index.php?title=Carrot_River_Mennonite_Church_(Carrot_River,_Saskatchewan,_Canada)&oldid=171890.




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