Mueller, Amelia Katherine (1911-2001)

From GAMEO
Jump to navigation Jump to search
Amelia and Adam Mueller.
Mennonite Library and Archives photo #2020-0003

Amelia Katherine Mueller: teacher and writer, was born 27 August 1911 on a farm northwest of Halstead, Kansas, USA, to Jacob Mueller (23 August 1877-16 June 1950) and Elizabeth Ellenberger Mueller (27 June 1882-4 March 1973). Amelia was the second child and oldest daughter in a family of four daughters and two sons. On 14 August 1976 Amelia married a widower, Adam Theodore Mueller (8 January 1904-12 January 2004) who was no relation. Amelia Mueller died 14 October 2001 at the Kidron Bethel Health Care Center, North Newton, Kansas. She is buried at the Halstead Cemetery, Halstead, Kansas.

The Jacob and Elizabeth Mueller family belonged to the Garden Township Mennonite Church. When Amelia was three her family, along with two of her father’s brothers' families, sold their farms and moved to Hamshire, Texas, north east of Houston. After a few years of crop failures in part due to two hurricanes, the Muellers tried to return to Halstead, but finding no land settled near relatives near Deer Creek, Oklahoma. Amelia attended local schools, but graduated from Halstead High School when her family was able to find a farm to rent and returned to Kansas before her senior year. They joined the Halstead Mennonite Church.

Amelia Mueller attended Bethel College for two years and obtained a teaching certificate. She taught second grade for two years in Mankato, Kansas. Then she obtained her BS from Emporia Normal School and taught third grade for a year in Manhattan before obtaining a position closer to home in Hutchinson. She taught in Hutchinson for 33 years with the exception of a year of teaching at the American Dependents School in Ansbach, Germany (1949-50). During that year she especially enjoyed visiting her mother’s extensive family throughout Germany and corresponded with these relatives regularly for decades.

In 1955 Amelia completed a MS degree from the University of Colorado and for the following years served as the Speech Clinician for the Hutchinson School District. She spent many summers advancing her education in this field. She retired in 1976 and a few months later married Adam Mueller, who had retired from Southeast Missouri State.

Amelia Mueller was a prolific author. She had extensive poems, articles, and short stories published in a wide variety of magazines. She also authored five books, hymns, and Sunday school materials. She was an active member of the Kansas Authors Club. Other vocations included quilting, crocheting, drawing, and painting. She joined a number of local civic groups, and participated with Adam in the American Iris Society.

Bibliography

GRANDMA (The Genealogical Registry and Database of Mennonite Ancestry) Database, 20-01 ed. Fresno, CA: " California Mennonite Historical Society, 2020: #494593.

Books by Amelia Mueller

Mueller, Amelia. There have to be six: a true story of pioneering in the midwest. Scottdale, Pa.: Herald Press, 1966.

_____. Sissy kid brother. Scottdale, Pa.: Herald Press, 1975.

_____. The Müller - Muller - Mueller and Weber genealogies. Halstead, Kan.: A. Mueller, 1981.

_____. A quiet strength : the Susanna Ruth Krehbiel story. Newton, Kan.: Faith and Life Press, 1992.

_____. Jeremy's jack-o-lantern. Newton, Kan.: Wordsworth, 1992.

Archives

Adam Theodore Mueller Papers, 1920-2004. MS.343, Mennonite Library and Archives, Bethel College, North Newton, Kansas.


Author(s) David A Haury
Date Published February 2020


Cite This Article

MLA style

Haury, David A. "Mueller, Amelia Katherine (1911-2001)." Global Anabaptist Mennonite Encyclopedia Online. February 2020. Web. 18 Sep 2020. https://gameo.org/index.php?title=Mueller,_Amelia_Katherine_(1911-2001)&oldid=166624.

APA style

Haury, David A. (February 2020). Mueller, Amelia Katherine (1911-2001). Global Anabaptist Mennonite Encyclopedia Online. Retrieved 18 September 2020, from https://gameo.org/index.php?title=Mueller,_Amelia_Katherine_(1911-2001)&oldid=166624.




©1996-2020 by the Global Anabaptist Mennonite Encyclopedia Online. All rights reserved.