Casselton Mennonite Church (Casselton, North Dakota, USA)

From GAMEO
Jump to navigation Jump to search

The Red River Valley Mennonite Church near Casselton, North Dakota, had its roots in 1928 when Mennonites responded to an invitation from the Amerland Land Company of Fargo, North Dakota, to settle the Chaffee Estate land in Amenia Township. On 19 June 1929, Isaac S. Mast organized the congregation with 15 members.

Initially, Red River Valley Mennonite was part of the Dakota-Montana Conference of the Mennonite Church (MC). This later became the North Central Conference of the Mennonite Church. In 1980 it also joined the Northern District of the General Conference Mennonite Church.

The congregation met in schools and a Moravian church until it purchased the former St. Stephen's Episcopal Church, an 1886 stone church building, in the fall of 1950. It held its first service there on 24 December 1950.

In 1959 the congregation changed its name to the Casselton Mennonite Church.

The Casselton Mennonite Church closed in 2002. The church building became the Casselton Heritage Center in 2004.

Bibliography

"Armenia, N. Dak." Gospel Herald 22, no. 11 (13 June 1929): 237.

"Casselton Heritage Center." City of Casselton. Web. 13 September 2023. https://www.casselton.com/casselton-heritage-center.

"Casselton, North Dakota." Gospel Herald 43, no. 46 (14 November 1950): 1133.

Schmidt, Diena, ed. The Northern District Conference of the General Conference Mennonite Church 1891-1991. Freeman, S.D.: The Conference, 1991: 132-133.

Stoll, A. J., Mrs. "Casselton, North Dakota." Gospel Herald 44, no. 9 (27 February 1951): 213.

Wikipedia contributors. "St. Stephen's Episcopal Church (Casselton, North Dakota)." Wikipedia, The Free Encyclopedia. Wikipedia, The Free Encyclopedia, 9 Aug. 2023. Web. 13 Sep. 2023.

Additional Information

Address: 241 Langer Avenue North, Casselton, North Dakota 58012

Phone:

Website:

Denominational Affiliations: Northern District Conference of the Mennonite Church

Mennonite Church (MC)

Northern District Conference

General Conference Mennonite Church

Pastoral Leaders at Casselton Mennonite Church

Name Years
of Service
Isaac S. "I. S." Mast (1874-1955)(Bishop) 1928-1942
Edward Hershberger (1897-1951)(Deacon) 1937-1948
Abraham J. "A. J." Stoll (1905-1985) 1944-1965
Norman H. Teague (1925-2013) 1966-1969
Marvin D. Yoder 1969-1976
Paul K. Smith 1977-1983
Harold W. Nussbaum (1924-2014) 1984-1991
Walter R. Clinton 1992-2002

Casselton Mennonite Church Membership

Year Members
1929 14
1940 37
1950 38
1960 58
1970 67
1980 61
1990 55
2000 32
2002 19

Original Mennonite Encyclopedia Article

By Abraham J. Stoll. Copied by permission of Herald Press, Harrisonburg, Virginia, from Mennonite Encyclopedia, Vol. 4, p. 263. All rights reserved.

Red River Valley Mennonite Church (Mennonite Church), located in Casselton, Cass County, North Dakota, is a member of the North Central Conference. In the spring of 1928 the families of I. S. Mast and Daniel L. Martin, now a minister in Sheldon, Wisconsin, moved into this community. The following spring several families moved in from Nebraska, and on 19 June 1929, the congregation was organized with 15 charter members. I. S. Mast was chosen as pastor. In 1942 Mast left the district; the congregation was without a resident pastor until 27 July 1947, when Abraham J. Stoll was ordained, who was still serving in 1956, with a membership of 47.


Author(s) Samuel J Steiner
Date Published September 2023

Cite This Article

MLA style

Steiner, Samuel J. "Casselton Mennonite Church (Casselton, North Dakota, USA)." Global Anabaptist Mennonite Encyclopedia Online. September 2023. Web. 26 Feb 2024. https://gameo.org/index.php?title=Casselton_Mennonite_Church_(Casselton,_North_Dakota,_USA)&oldid=177533.

APA style

Steiner, Samuel J. (September 2023). Casselton Mennonite Church (Casselton, North Dakota, USA). Global Anabaptist Mennonite Encyclopedia Online. Retrieved 26 February 2024, from https://gameo.org/index.php?title=Casselton_Mennonite_Church_(Casselton,_North_Dakota,_USA)&oldid=177533.




©1996-2024 by the Global Anabaptist Mennonite Encyclopedia Online. All rights reserved.