Difference between revisions of "Altona Bergthaler Mennonite Church (Altona, Manitoba, Canada)"

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Revision as of 18:06, 27 March 2020

Altona Bergthaler Mennonite Church, 1963.
Photo: Mennonite Heritage Archives (49:01).
Altona Bergthaler Mennonite Church, 2020.
Photo: Google street view
.

The Altona Bergthaler Mennonite Church traces its beginning to 1885 when the Chortitzer ministers from the Manitoba Mennonite East Reserve held services in the school in Alt Altona. In 1892 the group became Bergthaler under the leadership of Johann Funk who resided in nearby Alt Bergthal. When a school was built in Altona in 1895, it became the centre for Bergthaler services. However, in keeping with the policy of the time, a church building was not erected in town but at Hochstadt, several miles east of Altona, and dedicated in 1898. After the move of the Mennonite Educational Institute to Altona in 1908 services were regularly conducted in that building. In 1912 the church got its own first building to serve members from Alt Altona, Alt Bergthal and Hochstadt. In 1919 this building was expanded and again in 1944. With the Bible School expanding in Altona it was decided to build a new building to accommodate the large gatherings in connection with the Bible School. A larger building was completed in 1954.

David Schulz served this congregation as leader 1926-1950 (and the larger Bergthaler Gemeinde until 1964). Other prominent Altona ministers, besides the ones listed below, included J.N. Hoeppner, P.P. Kehler and D.F. Friesen.

The language of worship was originally German and the transition to English occurred in the 1960s.

Bibliography

Ens, Anna. In Search of Unity: Story of the Conference of Mennonites in Manitoba. Winnipeg, Manitoba: CMBC Publications, 1996.

Epp-Thiessen, Esther.  Altona: The Story of a Prairie Town. Altona, Man. : D.W. Friesen, 1982.

Gerbrandt, H.J. Adventure in Faith. Altona: Bergthaler Mennonite Church of Manitoba, 1970.

Mennonite Reporter (May 15, 1978), 11; (Mar. 18, 1996), 15.

Unpublished congregational history, 1979, 12 pp. MHC.

Archival Records:

Microfilmed records at Mennonite Heritage Centre.

Additional Information

Address: 117 2nd Street NW, Altona, Manitoba R0G 0B1 (Co-ordinates )

Phone: 204-324-6717

Website: abchurchcommunity.ca

Denominational Afflication: Bergthal Mennonite Church of Manitoba (1893-1972)

Conference of Mennonites in Manitoba / Mennonite Church Manitoba (1947-

[Conference of Mennonites in Canada]] / Mennonite Church Canada (1903-

General Conference Mennonite Church (1968-2002)


Altona Bergthaler Mennonite Church Leading Ministers

Minister Years of service
Johann Funk 1892-1911
David Schulz 1920-1950
Henry J. Gerbrandt 1950-1971
D.F. Friesen 1971-1979
Walter Franz 1979-1991
Randy Klaassen 1991-1997
Jacob F. Pauls 1998
Peter Penner 1999-2003
Rick Neufeld 2003-2015
Walter Hiebert (interim) 2016-2017
Mark Tiessen-Dyck 2018-

Altona Bergthaler Mennonite Church Membership

Year Membership
1965 529
1975 590
1985 637
1995 561
2000 532
2008 411


Author(s) Marlene Epp
Alf Redekopp
Date Published March 2020


Cite This Article

MLA style

Epp, Marlene and Alf Redekopp. "Altona Bergthaler Mennonite Church (Altona, Manitoba, Canada)." Global Anabaptist Mennonite Encyclopedia Online. March 2020. Web. 19 Sep 2020. https://gameo.org/index.php?title=Altona_Bergthaler_Mennonite_Church_(Altona,_Manitoba,_Canada)&oldid=167016.

APA style

Epp, Marlene and Alf Redekopp. (March 2020). Altona Bergthaler Mennonite Church (Altona, Manitoba, Canada). Global Anabaptist Mennonite Encyclopedia Online. Retrieved 19 September 2020, from https://gameo.org/index.php?title=Altona_Bergthaler_Mennonite_Church_(Altona,_Manitoba,_Canada)&oldid=167016.




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