From GAMEO
Jump to: navigation, search

Minister of Music is an office which only entered the Mennonite churches of America in the mid-20th century, and was then still unknown in Europe and elsewhere, although in some of the larger Protestant denominations it had been the practice for some time to make a professionally trained person responsible for the music program of a congregation. With the traditional Mennonite interest in music and with the growing multiple responsibilities of the pastor of a congregation, whose first responsibility it was to preach the Gospel, and to counsel and visit the members of the church, it became desirable to make one person responsible for the musical work of the congregation. At times this office also included the leadership of the young people's activities. As a rule such an individual has had some theological as well as musical training. Congregations (only General Conference Mennonite) which in 1957 employed full- or part-time ministers of music were Bethel Mennonite Church, Mountain Lake, MN; Bethel College Mennonite Church, North Newton, KS; Bethesda Mennonite Church, Henderson, NE; First Mennonite Church, Berne, IN; First Mennonite Church, Newton, KS; First Mennonite Church, Reedley, CA. In some churches which have had such an office it was vacant in 1957, and others were planning to create it.


Author(s) Cornelius Krahn
Date Published 1957


[edit] Cite This Article

MLA style

Krahn, Cornelius. "Minister of Music." Global Anabaptist Mennonite Encyclopedia Online. 1957. Web. 28 Dec 2014. http://gameo.org/index.php?title=Minister_of_Music&oldid=90014.

APA style

Krahn, Cornelius. (1957). Minister of Music. Global Anabaptist Mennonite Encyclopedia Online. Retrieved 28 December 2014, from http://gameo.org/index.php?title=Minister_of_Music&oldid=90014.




Hpbuttns.gif
Adapted by permission of Herald Press, Harrisonburg, Virginia, and Waterloo, Ontario, from Mennonite Encyclopedia, Vol. 3, pp. 695-696. All rights reserved. For information on ordering the encyclopedia visit the Herald Press website.


©1996-2014 by the Global Anabaptist Mennonite Encyclopedia Online. All rights reserved.