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Youth Committee of the Mennonite Brethren Conference, consisting of five members, came into being at the 1936 convention of the General Conference. At the 1933 general conference a Young People's Union Committee had been organized which produced several quarterly leaflets of study helps for young people's organizations in the churches in 1934. The Youth Committee began the Christian Leader in April 1937, which continued under its jurisdiction until the 1951 General Conference sessions, when it became the official English organ of the Conference and was placed under the jurisdiction of the Publication Committee. The Youth Committee sponsored Christian Fellowship organizations in the churches, promoted youth camps and other young people's activities. More and more, however, the youth work became a matter of the district conferences because of local conditions; in the revised constitution of the Conference as temporarily adopted in 1954 it became a consultative committee composed of one member at large and representatives from the youth committees of the districts. Since then the youth work has rested almost solely with the districts.


Author(s) Orlando Harms
Date Published 1959


[edit] Cite This Article

MLA style

Harms, Orlando. "Youth Committee of the Mennonite Brethren Conference." Global Anabaptist Mennonite Encyclopedia Online. 1959. Web. 27 Nov 2014. http://gameo.org/index.php?title=Youth_Committee_of_the_Mennonite_Brethren_Conference&oldid=78948.

APA style

Harms, Orlando. (1959). Youth Committee of the Mennonite Brethren Conference. Global Anabaptist Mennonite Encyclopedia Online. Retrieved 27 November 2014, from http://gameo.org/index.php?title=Youth_Committee_of_the_Mennonite_Brethren_Conference&oldid=78948.




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Adapted by permission of Herald Press, Harrisonburg, Virginia, and Waterloo, Ontario, from Mennonite Encyclopedia, Vol. 4, pp. 1010-1011. All rights reserved. For information on ordering the encyclopedia visit the Herald Press website.


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