From GAMEO
Jump to: navigation, search
[checked revision][checked revision]
(CSV import - 20130820)
m
Line 1: Line 1:
South Danvers Mennonite Church, located two miles (3.2 km.) south of Danvers, [[McLean County (Illinois, USA)|McLean County]], [[Illinois (USA)|Illinois]], was formed by the Hessian Mennonites from [[Butler County (Ohio, USA)|Butler County]], [[Ohio (State)|Ohio]], who had begun to have worship in their homes in 1842, then joined the [[Yoder Amish Mennonite Church (Rock Creek, Illinois, USA)|Yoder Amish Church]] (North Danvers), when it built its meetinghouse in 1853 about five miles northeast of Danvers. But in 1859 the Hessian group withdrew, building its own meetinghouse in 1864, with about 100 members. In 1908 it joined the [[Central Conference Mennonite Church|Central Conference]]. In 1914 the congregation added a rented church building in the town of Danvers, and in 1919 closed the country building. In 1943, with 34 members left, it merged with [[North Danvers Mennonite Church (Danvers, Illinois, USA)|North Danvers]]. Early ministers ware Michael Kistler 1842-1855, and Christian Gingerich 1855-1908. John Kinsinger and John Gingerich were the leaders from 1885 to the late 1920s.
+
South Danvers Mennonite Church, located two miles (3.2 km) south of Danvers, [[McLean County (Illinois, USA)|McLean County]], [[Illinois (USA)|Illinois]], was formed by the Hessian Mennonites from [[Butler County (Ohio, USA)|Butler County]], [[Ohio (State)|Ohio]], who had begun to have worship in their homes in 1842, then joined the [[Yoder Amish Mennonite Church (Rock Creek, Illinois, USA)|Yoder Amish Church]] (North Danvers), when it built its meetinghouse in 1853 about five miles northeast of Danvers. But in 1859 the Hessian group withdrew, building its own meetinghouse in 1864, with about 100 members. In 1908 it joined the [[Central Conference Mennonite Church|Central Conference]]. In 1914 the congregation added a rented church building in the town of Danvers, and in 1919 closed the country building. In 1943, with 34 members left, it merged with [[North Danvers Mennonite Church (Danvers, Illinois, USA)|North Danvers]]. Early ministers ware Michael Kistler 1842-1855, and Christian Gingerich 1855-1908. John Kinsinger and John Gingerich were the leaders from 1885 to the late 1920s.
 
{{GAMEO_footer|hp=Vol. 4, p. 1127|date=1959|a1_last=Bender|a1_first=Harold S|a2_last=|a2_first=}}
 
{{GAMEO_footer|hp=Vol. 4, p. 1127|date=1959|a1_last=Bender|a1_first=Harold S|a2_last=|a2_first=}}

Revision as of 17:39, 20 January 2014

South Danvers Mennonite Church, located two miles (3.2 km) south of Danvers, McLean County, Illinois, was formed by the Hessian Mennonites from Butler County, Ohio, who had begun to have worship in their homes in 1842, then joined the Yoder Amish Church (North Danvers), when it built its meetinghouse in 1853 about five miles northeast of Danvers. But in 1859 the Hessian group withdrew, building its own meetinghouse in 1864, with about 100 members. In 1908 it joined the Central Conference. In 1914 the congregation added a rented church building in the town of Danvers, and in 1919 closed the country building. In 1943, with 34 members left, it merged with North Danvers. Early ministers ware Michael Kistler 1842-1855, and Christian Gingerich 1855-1908. John Kinsinger and John Gingerich were the leaders from 1885 to the late 1920s.


Author(s) Harold S Bender
Date Published 1959


Cite This Article

MLA style

Bender, Harold S. "South Danvers Mennonite Church (Danvers, Illinois, USA)." Global Anabaptist Mennonite Encyclopedia Online. 1959. Web. 26 Jul 2014. http://gameo.org/index.php?title=South_Danvers_Mennonite_Church_(Danvers,_Illinois,_USA)&oldid=110221.

APA style

Bender, Harold S. (1959). South Danvers Mennonite Church (Danvers, Illinois, USA). Global Anabaptist Mennonite Encyclopedia Online. Retrieved 26 July 2014, from http://gameo.org/index.php?title=South_Danvers_Mennonite_Church_(Danvers,_Illinois,_USA)&oldid=110221.




Hpbuttns.gif
Adapted by permission of Herald Press, Harrisonburg, Virginia, and Waterloo, Ontario, from Mennonite Encyclopedia, Vol. 4, p. 1127. All rights reserved. For information on ordering the encyclopedia visit the Herald Press website.


©1996-2014 by the Global Anabaptist Mennonite Encyclopedia Online. All rights reserved.