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Werner von Pallant, bailiff of Wassenberg, in the duchy of Jülich, Germany, about 1530, friendly toward the Anabaptists. He declared expressly that he could not act contrary to his conscience in dealing with them. He denied the right of temporal government in religious matters. His castle was a haven for exiled preachers from far and wide (see Wassenberg "Preachers"). He was also interested in the development of Anabaptism in Münster before this degenerated into extravagant fanaticism, and Johann Klopreis wrote a letter to him from Münster, which was delivered by Jacob van Ossenbrug in February 1534. Pallant refused to carry out a new instruction for church inspection by Johann III, Duke of Jülich, in the district of Wassenberg. In 1534 he was deposed from office. Even after this he remained the protector of the victims of religious persecution.

[edit] Bibliography

Bax, W. Het Protestantisme in het bisdom Luik I. The Hague, 1937: 57-59 and passim.

Hege, Christian and Christian Neff. Mennonitisches Lexikon, 4 vols. Frankfurt & Weierhof: Hege; Karlsruhe: Schneider, 1913-1967: v. II, 332.

Rembert, Karl. Die "Wiedertäufer" im Herzogtum Jülich. Berlin: R. Gaertners Verlagsbuchhandlung, 1899: 146-150.


Author(s) Christian Neff
Date Published 1959


[edit] Cite This Article

MLA style

Neff, Christian. "Pallant, Werner von (16th century)." Global Anabaptist Mennonite Encyclopedia Online. 1959. Web. 23 Aug 2014. http://gameo.org/index.php?title=Pallant,_Werner_von_(16th_century)&oldid=106006.

APA style

Neff, Christian. (1959). Pallant, Werner von (16th century). Global Anabaptist Mennonite Encyclopedia Online. Retrieved 23 August 2014, from http://gameo.org/index.php?title=Pallant,_Werner_von_(16th_century)&oldid=106006.




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Adapted by permission of Herald Press, Harrisonburg, Virginia, and Waterloo, Ontario, from Mennonite Encyclopedia, Vol. 4, p. 113. All rights reserved. For information on ordering the encyclopedia visit the Herald Press website.


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