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Henry H. Neufeld (1912-1967)

Henry H. Neufeld: minister and teacher; born 3 July 1912 in Lugovsk, Samara, Russia. He was the fourth child of Heinrich D. Neufeld (20 January 1884 - 29 November 1919, Orloff, Zagradovka, South Russia) and Maria (Walde) Neufeld (31 March 1885 - 24 January 1967). Henry married Anna Epp (21 July 1914, Siberia, Russia - 18 November 2007, Abbotsford, British Columbia) on 4 June 1939 in Hussar, Alberta. She was the daughter of Peter P. Epp (30 November 1871 - 22 May 1965) and Margaretha (Klassen) Epp (23 April 1879 - 28 September 1962). Henry and Anna had six children: Mary, Nita, Elnora, Ruth, Walter and Elaine. Henry died 10 May 1967 in St. Paul's Hospital in Vancouver, British Columbia following an operation.

Henry's father was murdered during the tumultuous years of the Russian Revolution, leaving his mother alone with seven children. Henry attended elementary school in Orloff, Zagradovka Mennonite Settlement, and the family eventually moved there. When many others immigrated to Canada, the family also migrated and settled in Rosemary, Alberta in 1925. Henry's mother later married Franz P. Froese in 1947.

Henry was baptized on 15 May 1932 and joined the Rosemary Mennonite Church. He attended the Prophetic Bible Institute in Calgary for three years from 1936 to 1939. The congregation of Rosemary Mennonite Church elected him to the ministry and ordained him in 1942. Realizing that a better knowledge of church history and Mennonite theology would be helpful in his ministry, he attended Winkler Bible School in 1942-43, and Mennonite Brethren Bible College in 1943-1944.

Due to failing health, Henry moved to Abbotsford, BC in 1946, where he became the first bilingual minister of the West Abbotsford Mennonite Church. Here he joined the faculty of Bethel Bible Institute and became its principal from 1948 until 1953.

At this time, the committee for Missions of the BC and Canadian Mennonite conferences opened a new English language ministry in Vancouver and called on Neufeld to be in charge of it. The Neufelds therefore moved to Vancouver and started the Vancouver Mennonite Mission Church (later Mountainview Mennonite Church). Henry was pastor of this congregation until 1956. After that, the East Chilliwack Mennonite Church (now Eden Mennonite Church) called him to become their pastor, a position he held from June 1956 until October 1962. During this time the congregation moved from its original location on Prest Road to its current location on Chilliwack Central Road. Henry then returned to Bethel Bible Institute in 1963 where he resumed teaching. After a year he accepted a call to minister in the First Mennonite Church Greendale congregation in 1964, serving until his death. Neufeld served as vice-chairman of the Conference of Mennonites in British Columbia from 1963 until 1966.

Henry Neufeld was a dedicated minister of the Gospel and loved to preach, teach and counsel. For many years he was the speaker on the Messengers of Peace radio program that the West Abbotsford Mennonite Church presented weekly over the Chilliwack radio station. His favorite hymn was "What A Wonderful Savior is Jesus My Lord."

[edit] Bibliography

Der Bote (30 May 1967): 7, 12.

The History of Eden Mennonite Church, Chilliwack, British Columbia 1945-1995. Chilliwack, BC: Eden Mennonite Church, 1995.

Peters, Gerhard. Remember Our Leaders: Conference of Mennonites in Canada 1902-1977. Clearbrook, BC: The Mennonite Historical Society of British Columbia, 1982.


Author(s) Richard D Thiessen
Date Published November 2007


[edit] Cite This Article

MLA style

Thiessen, Richard D. "Neufeld, Henry H. (1912-1967)." Global Anabaptist Mennonite Encyclopedia Online. November 2007. Web. 25 Jul 2014. http://gameo.org/index.php?title=Neufeld,_Henry_H._(1912-1967)&oldid=123443.

APA style

Thiessen, Richard D. (November 2007). Neufeld, Henry H. (1912-1967). Global Anabaptist Mennonite Encyclopedia Online. Retrieved 25 July 2014, from http://gameo.org/index.php?title=Neufeld,_Henry_H._(1912-1967)&oldid=123443.




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