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Amanda Musselman spent 25 years in pioneer missionary service in Philadelphia, PA. Born 17 October 1869 near New Holland, PA the daughter of Jacob and Mary Stoner Musselman, she was converted in 1896, after two friends died in an accident returning from a party. Amanda was baptized into the Groffdale Mennonite Church and became involved in the newly organized Sunday school. In 1899, after spending a winter to gain experience at the Chicago Home Mission, she moved with Mary Denlinger to Philadelphia and began work under the direction of the Mennonite Sunday School Mission. Building strong community ties, the two women carried responsibility for the mission (later the Norris Square Mennonite Church) until J. Paul Graybill was appointed full-time pastor in 1922. Amanda and Mary left Philadelphia in 1924, spent the summer of 1925 at Mummasburg, Pennsylvania, and in the autumn moved to Lancaster, where Amanda became active in the East Chestnut Street congregation. She died 17 June 1940 and was buried at Groffdale.

[edit] Bibliography

Pennsylvania Mennonite Heritage 5 (October 1982): 2-18.

Rich, Elaine Sommers. Mennonite Women: A Story of God's Faithfulness, 1683-1983. Scottdale, PA: Herald Press, 1983: 131, 150, 165.


Author(s) A. Grace Wenger
Date Published 1987


[edit] Cite This Article

MLA style

Wenger, A. Grace. "Musselman, Amanda (1869-1940)." Global Anabaptist Mennonite Encyclopedia Online. 1987. Web. 10 Jul 2014. http://gameo.org/index.php?title=Musselman,_Amanda_(1869-1940)&oldid=121502.

APA style

Wenger, A. Grace. (1987). Musselman, Amanda (1869-1940). Global Anabaptist Mennonite Encyclopedia Online. Retrieved 10 July 2014, from http://gameo.org/index.php?title=Musselman,_Amanda_(1869-1940)&oldid=121502.




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Adapted by permission of Herald Press, Harrisonburg, Virginia, and Waterloo, Ontario, from Mennonite Encyclopedia, Vol. 5, p. 613. All rights reserved. For information on ordering the encyclopedia visit the Herald Press website.


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