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Kleefeld, a common Mennonite village name transplanted from Russia to America. The name appeared in the following Mennonite settlements: Molotschna and Barnaul, Russia; East and West Reserve, Manitoba, Canada, Cuauhtemoc, Mexico and in Menno and Fernheim Settlements, Chaco, Paraguay.

The village Kleefeld in the Molotschna Mennonite settlement in the Ukraine, Russia, situated on the left bank of the Yushanlee River, was founded in 1854 by 40 families, and was the second youngest village of the Halbstadt volost. The village comprised 8,300 acres of land.

The village Kleefeld in the Fernheim settlement in Paraguay was founded in 1929. By 1950 it had 104 inhabitants.

The village of Kleefeld (formerly Gruenfeld), 30 miles (50 km) southeast of the city of Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada, has the distinction of being the first Mennonite village in Western Canada.

[edit] Bibliography

Fast, Henry. Gruenfeld (now Kleefeld) 1874-1910: First Mennonite Village in Western Canada. Steinbach, Manitoba : Henry Fast, 2006.

Fretz, J. W. Pilgrims in Paraguay. Scottdale, 1953: 81

Hege, Christian and Christian Neff. Mennonitisches Lexikon, 4 vols. Frankfurt & Weierhof: Hege; Karlsruhe: Schneider, 1913-1967: v. II, 507.

Neuer Haus- und Landwirtschafts-Kalender. Odessa, 1911: XLIII, 108.


Author(s) Cornelius Krahn
Christian Hege
Date Published 1957


[edit] Cite This Article

MLA style

Krahn, Cornelius and Christian Hege. "Kleefeld." Global Anabaptist Mennonite Encyclopedia Online. 1957. Web. 27 Nov 2014. http://gameo.org/index.php?title=Kleefeld&oldid=88725.

APA style

Krahn, Cornelius and Christian Hege. (1957). Kleefeld. Global Anabaptist Mennonite Encyclopedia Online. Retrieved 27 November 2014, from http://gameo.org/index.php?title=Kleefeld&oldid=88725.




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Adapted by permission of Herald Press, Harrisonburg, Virginia, and Waterloo, Ontario, from Mennonite Encyclopedia, Vol. 3, p. 194. All rights reserved. For information on ordering the encyclopedia visit the Herald Press website.


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