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Kornelius Hildebrandt (1833-1920), a Mennonite manufacturer of the Ukraine, South Russia, was born on 21 January 1833, on the island of Chortitza in the Chortitza Mennonite Settlement. He worked for many years as a poor clockmaker. With the rise of industry in the settlement, however, the business flourished, and was established as a firm in 1878. In 1903 he transferred the management to his children; it then had the title, "K. Hildebrandts Erben und Priess." The partner Priess (1863-1922) was Hildebrandt's son-in-law; he was the actual founder and for many years the manager of the firm, which had a capital stock of 500,000 rubles. The factory consisted of two branches, one located in the Chortitza settlement and the other established in 1892 in Schönwiese. At the beginning of World War I the Chortitza branch employed about 80 workers, and the Schönwiese branch 100, with an annual output valued at 500,000 rubles. The firm was engaged almost exclusively in the manufacture of farm machinery, with reapers and drills as a specialty, which were sold as far away as Siberia.

[edit] Bibliography

Hege, Christian and Christian Neff.  Mennonitisches Lexikon. Frankfurt & Weierhof: Hege; Karlsruhe; Schneider, 1913-1967: II, 313.


Author(s) David H Epp
Date Published 1956


[edit] Cite This Article

MLA style

Epp, David H. "Hildebrandt, Kornelius (1833-1920)." Global Anabaptist Mennonite Encyclopedia Online. 1956. Web. 2 Oct 2014. http://gameo.org/index.php?title=Hildebrandt,_Kornelius_(1833-1920)&oldid=118097.

APA style

Epp, David H. (1956). Hildebrandt, Kornelius (1833-1920). Global Anabaptist Mennonite Encyclopedia Online. Retrieved 2 October 2014, from http://gameo.org/index.php?title=Hildebrandt,_Kornelius_(1833-1920)&oldid=118097.




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Adapted by permission of Herald Press, Harrisonburg, Virginia, and Waterloo, Ontario, from Mennonite Encyclopedia, Vol. 2, p. 741. All rights reserved. For information on ordering the encyclopedia visit the Herald Press website.


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