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Guillaume Farel. Source: Wikipedia Commons
Guillaume Farel was the ardent friend and co-worker of Calvin. He was an unusually energetic pioneer in the Reformation in France, and was particularly enthusiastic in introducing it in Geneva, Switzerland, persuading Calvin to settle there, co-operated in Neuchätel, and in Metz, France. At first his position was close to that of the Anabaptists; he agreed with them on adult baptism, but was unwilling to forbid infant baptism (letter of 7 September 1527). Zwingli's ideas concerning the Zürich Anabaptists apparently influenced him, but he still defended the Anabaptists against unjust accusations. Later he accepted Calvin's views and took the same position as he against them.

[edit] Bibliography

Bevan, Frances A. Vie de Guillaume Farel. Lausanne, H. Mignot, 1885.

Guillame Farel 1489-1565. Neuchatel, 1930.

Hege, Christian and Christian Neff. Mennonitisches Lexikon, 4 v. Frankfurt & Weierhof: Hege; Karlsruhe: Schneider, 1913-1967: v. I, 314-316, 632.

Herminjard, A.-L. Correspondance des réformateurs dans les pays de langue franc̦aise, recueillie et publiée avec d'autres lettres relatives à la réforme et des notes historiques et biographiques. Genève: H. Georg [etc., etc], 1866-: II, 18, 48, 164.


Author(s) Christian Neff
Date Published 1956


[edit] Cite This Article

MLA style

Neff, Christian. "Farel, Guillaume (1489-1565)." Global Anabaptist Mennonite Encyclopedia Online. 1956. Web. 29 Aug 2014. http://gameo.org/index.php?title=Farel,_Guillaume_(1489-1565)&oldid=118937.

APA style

Neff, Christian. (1956). Farel, Guillaume (1489-1565). Global Anabaptist Mennonite Encyclopedia Online. Retrieved 29 August 2014, from http://gameo.org/index.php?title=Farel,_Guillaume_(1489-1565)&oldid=118937.




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Adapted by permission of Herald Press, Harrisonburg, Virginia, and Waterloo, Ontario, from Mennonite Encyclopedia, Vol. 2, p. 301. All rights reserved. For information on ordering the encyclopedia visit the Herald Press website.


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