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Dyserinck (also Dyselinck) is a Dutch Mennonite family, originally from Flanders, Belgium. Cornelis Dyserinck, born at Bruges, Belgium, in 1608, left the Roman Catholic Church and emigrated to Aardenburg, in the Dutch province of Zeeland, in 1637; in 1639 he was baptized there and was a strong pillar of the congregation until his death, 30 April 1688. He was a deacon for many years, and after 1681 he seems also to have been a preacher. After the middle of the 18th century the Dyserinck family moved from Aardenburg to Haarlem, where they were engaged in several kinds of business and industry. During the 18th century a wing of this family was living at Middelburg.

A prominent member of this family was Hendrik Dyserinck, born 1811 at Haarlem and died 1906, who after a successful military career became a Dutch state Minister of the Navy, 1888-1891. He was a brother of the Mennonite minister Johannes Dyserinck.

[edit] Bibliography

Doopsgezinde Bijdragen (1877): 7-8; (1884): 40.

Molhuysen, P. C. and P. J. Blok. Nieuw Nederlandsch Biografisch Woordenboek. v. 1-10. Leiden, 1911-1937: IV, 550-551.

Nederland's patriciaat: genealogieën van vooraanstaande geslachten. 's-Gravenhage: Centraal Bureau voor Genealogie. 1911: 116-121.


Author(s) Nanne van der Zijpp
Date Published 1956


[edit] Cite This Article

MLA style

Zijpp, Nanne van der. "Dyserinck (Dyselinck) family." Global Anabaptist Mennonite Encyclopedia Online. 1956. Web. 13 Jul 2014. http://gameo.org/index.php?title=Dyserinck_(Dyselinck)_family&oldid=120703.

APA style

Zijpp, Nanne van der. (1956). Dyserinck (Dyselinck) family. Global Anabaptist Mennonite Encyclopedia Online. Retrieved 13 July 2014, from http://gameo.org/index.php?title=Dyserinck_(Dyselinck)_family&oldid=120703.




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Adapted by permission of Herald Press, Harrisonburg, Virginia, and Waterloo, Ontario, from Mennonite Encyclopedia, Vol. 2, p. 116. All rights reserved. For information on ordering the encyclopedia visit the Herald Press website.


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