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The Cheyenne Mennonite Mission Church (General Conference Mennonite Church), more commonly known as the Deer Creek Mennonite Church (Indian), located six miles (ten km) south of Thomas, Custer County, Oklahoma, was organized in 1928 with 11 members, under the leadership of J. B. Ediger. In 1924, to avoid confusion, the various denominations working in the area turned this field over to the General Conference Mennonite Church, since they were already working near by. Services were held once each month in private homes. In February 1930 the new church was dedicated and the church was accepted as a member of the General Conference Mennonite Church with 55 members in August 1935.

Services were regularly held every Sunday in the 1950s. The membership in 1949 was 38. Missionaries who served the congregation until the early 1950s were the J. B. Edigers, H. J. Kliewers, Arthur Friesens, and Herbert M. Dalkes.

[edit] Bibliography

Krehbiel, H. P. The history of the General Conference of the Mennonites of North America, 2 vols. Canton, OH; Newton, KS: The Author, 1898-1938: v. 2, 550.


Author(s) Herbert H Dalke
Date Published 1953


[edit] Cite This Article

MLA style

Dalke, Herbert H. "Cheyenne Mennonite Mission Church (Custer Country, Oklahoma, USA)." Global Anabaptist Mennonite Encyclopedia Online. 1953. Web. 18 Apr 2014. http://gameo.org/index.php?title=Cheyenne_Mennonite_Mission_Church_(Custer_Country,_Oklahoma,_USA)&oldid=102945.

APA style

Dalke, Herbert H. (1953). Cheyenne Mennonite Mission Church (Custer Country, Oklahoma, USA). Global Anabaptist Mennonite Encyclopedia Online. Retrieved 18 April 2014, from http://gameo.org/index.php?title=Cheyenne_Mennonite_Mission_Church_(Custer_Country,_Oklahoma,_USA)&oldid=102945.




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Adapted by permission of Herald Press, Harrisonburg, Virginia, and Waterloo, Ontario, from Mennonite Encyclopedia, Vol. 1, p. 554. All rights reserved. For information on ordering the encyclopedia visit the Herald Press website.


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