From GAMEO
Jump to: navigation, search

Norman C. Buschert: deacon in the West Zion Mennonite Church near Carstairs, Alberta, was born 2 October 1872 near Kitchener, Ontario, and died 16 November 1935 near Carstairs, Alberta. He married Mary Weber, formerly of Berlin (Kitchener), on 2 December 1903. They were the parents of 6 children.

Norman Buschert purchased a homestead in the Carstairs district in 1900 and was one of the founding members when the West Zion Mennonite Church was organized in 1901. Mary Weber was one of two young ladies who arrived in Carstairs from Ontario in 1902. She and Norman were the first couple to be married in the West Zion Mennonite church. They remained in the community and continued to serve the church all through their married life.

In 1925 Norman Buschert was ordained by lot to the office of deacon, a position he filled diligently and sacrificially until the time of his fatal illness in 1935. He suffered a stroke in 1934 but regained his health briefly but died shortly after a second stroke in November of 1935.

[edit] Bibliography

Regehr, T. D. Faith, Life and Witness in the Northwest, 1903-2003: Centennial History of the Northwest Mennonite Conference. Kitchener, ON : Pandora Press, 2003.

Harder, Richard, ed. West Zion Mennonite Church: Centennial Scrapbook, 1901-2001. Carstairs, Alberta : West Zion Mennonite Church, 2000.

Stauffer, Ezra. History of the Alberta-Saskatchewan Mennonite Conference. Ryley, Alberta : Alberta-Saskatchewan Mennonite Conference, 1960.


Author(s) Ted D Regehr
Date Published December 2003


[edit] Cite This Article

MLA style

Regehr, Ted D. "Buschert, Norman C. (1872-1935)." Global Anabaptist Mennonite Encyclopedia Online. December 2003. Web. 17 Sep 2014. http://gameo.org/index.php?title=Buschert,_Norman_C._(1872-1935)&oldid=122455.

APA style

Regehr, Ted D. (December 2003). Buschert, Norman C. (1872-1935). Global Anabaptist Mennonite Encyclopedia Online. Retrieved 17 September 2014, from http://gameo.org/index.php?title=Buschert,_Norman_C._(1872-1935)&oldid=122455.




©1996-2014 by the Global Anabaptist Mennonite Encyclopedia Online. All rights reserved.