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The Board of Missions (General Conference Mennonite) was formed by combining and reorganizing the former Foreign Missions Board and Home Missions Board when the new constitution of the General Conference Mennonite Church was adopted at its 32nd session at Freeman, South Dakota, in August 1950. The board was "charged with all responsibility of the conference in the areas of missions and evangelism at home and abroad according to the instructions, decisions, and regulations of the conference." It consisted of 12 members, four of whom were elected at each regular session of the conference, and was divided into the Section on Foreign Missions and Section on Home Missions. In addition to this the Board of Missions consisted of a Church Unity Committee, Evangelism Committee, Mission Personnel Committee, and Ministry Committee.

The Board of Missions had a full-time secretary with an office in the General Conference headquarters, 722 Main St., Newton, Kansas. A subsequent constitutional change in 1968 saw the the work of this board carried by two new Commissions on Overseas Ministries and Home Ministries.


Author(s) Cornelius Krahn
Date Published 1953


[edit] Cite This Article

MLA style

Krahn, Cornelius. "Board of Missions (General Conference Mennonite Church)." Global Anabaptist Mennonite Encyclopedia Online. 1953. Web. 23 Sep 2014. http://gameo.org/index.php?title=Board_of_Missions_(General_Conference_Mennonite_Church)&oldid=75789.

APA style

Krahn, Cornelius. (1953). Board of Missions (General Conference Mennonite Church). Global Anabaptist Mennonite Encyclopedia Online. Retrieved 23 September 2014, from http://gameo.org/index.php?title=Board_of_Missions_(General_Conference_Mennonite_Church)&oldid=75789.




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Adapted by permission of Herald Press, Harrisonburg, Virginia, and Waterloo, Ontario, from Mennonite Encyclopedia, Vol. 1, p. 375. All rights reserved. For information on ordering the encyclopedia visit the Herald Press website.


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