Difference between revisions of "Rosenort Fellowship Chapel (Rosenort, Manitoba, Canada)"

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(Pastoral Leaders at Rosenort Fellowship Chapel)
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| Milton Fast (Interim) || 2001
 
| Milton Fast (Interim) || 2001
 
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| John Driedger || 2001-
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| John Driedger || 2001-2013
 
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| Brian McGuffin ||  
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| Brian McGuffin || 2015-
 
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== Membership at Rosenort Fellowship Chapel ==
 
== Membership at Rosenort Fellowship Chapel ==
 
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Revision as of 16:14, 11 July 2018

Rosenort Felloship Chapel, located in Rosenort, Manitoba, grew out of the desire that a group of people had to see a church in the centre of the town. After much prayer, plans resulted in renovating the vacant Greenbank school building and church services began on 6 October 1968. Pastor Melvin Dueck led the initial congregation of 38 members, together with Peter J. B. Reimer as intermittent pastor.

As the attendance grew, plans were drawn up to build a more permanent church building beside the main highway in town. Rosenort Fellowship Chapel was the name chosen for the new church. It has been affiliated with the Evangelical Mennonite Conference since 1969.

Rosenort Fellowship Chapel had been blessed with God-loving, caring, mission-minded pastors from the beginning. When Melvin Dueck could no longer lead the church, Alfred Friesen served. Stan Plett then took over the pastorate for a number of years. Darrel Crocker served as assistant pastor. Michael Derksen filled the pulpit for several years, followed by interim pastors Milton Fast and John Koop.

John Klassen served for about 10 years. John Driedger followed him and cared for the church for 12 years. When John Driedger retired, Brian McGuffin came to serve.

The church was also blessed with youth leaders and youth pastors who faithfully guided its young people, resulting in many being called to serve the Lord around the world. Ken Quiring led the youth around 1994, with many others to follow. Craig and Laura Cornelsen were seen the youth pastoral couple in 2018.

Rosenort Fellowship Chapel also worked to plant a church in Oak Bluff, as several of its members left to join pastoral couple Troy and CoraLee Selley to help start Oak Bluff Bible Church on 11 September 2005.

The congregation has been guided by the following vision statement: “Caring for the community, communicating the truth.”

A 50th annivesary celebration was scheduled for 15-16 September 2018.

Bibliography

Canadian Mennonite (8 October 1968): 1.

Wiebe, John, ed. Rosenort Fellowship Chapel. 1975, 35 pp.

Church records at the church.

Additional Information

Meeting place: 65 Frontage Road, Rosenort, Manitoba

Address: Box 188, Rosenort, MB R0G 1W0

Phone: 204-746-8360

Website: Rosenort Fellowship Chapel

Denominational Affiliations: Evangelical Mennonite Conference

Pastoral Leaders at Rosenort Fellowship Chapel

Name Years
of Service
Melvin Dueck 1968-1975
Fred Friesen 1975-1980
Stan Plett 1980-1990
Michael Derksen 1991-1994
John Klassen 1994-2000
Milton Fast (Interim) 2001
John Driedger 2001-2013
Brian McGuffin 2015-

Membership at Rosenort Fellowship Chapel

Year Membership
1970 68
1975 97
1980 144
1985 190
1990 198
1995 195
2000 175
2005 116
2010 137
2015 118


Author(s) Rose Cornelsen
Heather Plett
Date Published July 2018


Cite This Article

MLA style

Cornelsen, Rose and Heather Plett. "Rosenort Fellowship Chapel (Rosenort, Manitoba, Canada)." Global Anabaptist Mennonite Encyclopedia Online. July 2018. Web. 19 Aug 2018. http://gameo.org/index.php?title=Rosenort_Fellowship_Chapel_(Rosenort,_Manitoba,_Canada)&oldid=161127.

APA style

Cornelsen, Rose and Heather Plett. (July 2018). Rosenort Fellowship Chapel (Rosenort, Manitoba, Canada). Global Anabaptist Mennonite Encyclopedia Online. Retrieved 19 August 2018, from http://gameo.org/index.php?title=Rosenort_Fellowship_Chapel_(Rosenort,_Manitoba,_Canada)&oldid=161127.




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