Difference between revisions of "Friedensfeld (Dnipropetrovsk Oblast, Ukraine)"

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Friedensfeld (<em>Miropol</em>), a Mennonite village with 5,400 acres of land in the province and district of [[Ekaterinoslav Guberniya (Ukraine)|Ekaterinoslav]] in [[Russia|South Russia]], 30 miles from Nikopol, was founded by 1867 by members of the [[Kleine Gemeinde|Kleine Gemeinde]] of the [[Molotschna Mennonite Settlement (Zaporizhia Oblast, Ukraine)|Molotschna settlement]]. Three families of settlers were [[Mennonite Brethren Church|Mennonite Brethren]]. In 1869 two other Mennonite Brethren families moved in; since the Kleine Gemeinde congregation was in the process of dissolution, all the remaining inhabitants of the village joined the Mennonite Brethren. Friedensfeld was at first a subsidiary of the Molotschna Mennonite Brethren Church, but in 1875 it was organized as an independent congregation with 45 members. Friedensfeld from the beginning gave much thought to its school system, and especially to clubs devoted to youth welfare, to music, and to singing. Several Baptist families were admitted into the village. Its fate after the Revolution and World War II was no doubt similar to that of other Molotschna villages.
 
Friedensfeld (<em>Miropol</em>), a Mennonite village with 5,400 acres of land in the province and district of [[Ekaterinoslav Guberniya (Ukraine)|Ekaterinoslav]] in [[Russia|South Russia]], 30 miles from Nikopol, was founded by 1867 by members of the [[Kleine Gemeinde|Kleine Gemeinde]] of the [[Molotschna Mennonite Settlement (Zaporizhia Oblast, Ukraine)|Molotschna settlement]]. Three families of settlers were [[Mennonite Brethren Church|Mennonite Brethren]]. In 1869 two other Mennonite Brethren families moved in; since the Kleine Gemeinde congregation was in the process of dissolution, all the remaining inhabitants of the village joined the Mennonite Brethren. Friedensfeld was at first a subsidiary of the Molotschna Mennonite Brethren Church, but in 1875 it was organized as an independent congregation with 45 members. Friedensfeld from the beginning gave much thought to its school system, and especially to clubs devoted to youth welfare, to music, and to singing. Several Baptist families were admitted into the village. Its fate after the Revolution and World War II was no doubt similar to that of other Molotschna villages.
 
= Bibliography =
 
= Bibliography =
Hege, Christian and Christian Neff. <em>Mennonitisches Lexikon</em>, 4 vols. Frankfurt &amp; Weierhof: Hege; Karlsruhe; Schneider, 1913-1967: v. I, 713.
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Hege, Christian and Christian Neff. ''Mennonitisches Lexikon'', 4 vols. Frankfurt &amp; Weierhof: Hege; Karlsruhe: Schneider, 1913-1967: v. I, 713.
 
{{GAMEO_footer|hp=Vol. 2, p. 400|date=1956|a1_last=Braun|a1_first=Abraham|a2_last=|a2_first=}}
 
{{GAMEO_footer|hp=Vol. 2, p. 400|date=1956|a1_last=Braun|a1_first=Abraham|a2_last=|a2_first=}}
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[[Category:Places]]
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[[Category:Mennonite Settlements in Russia]]

Latest revision as of 00:06, 16 January 2017

Friedensfeld (Miropol), a Mennonite village with 5,400 acres of land in the province and district of Ekaterinoslav in South Russia, 30 miles from Nikopol, was founded by 1867 by members of the Kleine Gemeinde of the Molotschna settlement. Three families of settlers were Mennonite Brethren. In 1869 two other Mennonite Brethren families moved in; since the Kleine Gemeinde congregation was in the process of dissolution, all the remaining inhabitants of the village joined the Mennonite Brethren. Friedensfeld was at first a subsidiary of the Molotschna Mennonite Brethren Church, but in 1875 it was organized as an independent congregation with 45 members. Friedensfeld from the beginning gave much thought to its school system, and especially to clubs devoted to youth welfare, to music, and to singing. Several Baptist families were admitted into the village. Its fate after the Revolution and World War II was no doubt similar to that of other Molotschna villages.

Bibliography

Hege, Christian and Christian Neff. Mennonitisches Lexikon, 4 vols. Frankfurt & Weierhof: Hege; Karlsruhe: Schneider, 1913-1967: v. I, 713.


Author(s) Abraham Braun
Date Published 1956


Cite This Article

MLA style

Braun, Abraham. "Friedensfeld (Dnipropetrovsk Oblast, Ukraine)." Global Anabaptist Mennonite Encyclopedia Online. 1956. Web. 5 Aug 2020. https://gameo.org/index.php?title=Friedensfeld_(Dnipropetrovsk_Oblast,_Ukraine)&oldid=145073.

APA style

Braun, Abraham. (1956). Friedensfeld (Dnipropetrovsk Oblast, Ukraine). Global Anabaptist Mennonite Encyclopedia Online. Retrieved 5 August 2020, from https://gameo.org/index.php?title=Friedensfeld_(Dnipropetrovsk_Oblast,_Ukraine)&oldid=145073.




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Adapted by permission of Herald Press, Harrisonburg, Virginia, from Mennonite Encyclopedia, Vol. 2, p. 400. All rights reserved.


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