Difference between revisions of "Bloomington (Illinois, USA)"

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Bloomington, [[Illinois (USA)|Illinois]], is a city of over 33,000 population in 1953 (almost 75,000 in 2006) located in [[McLean County (Illinois, USA)|McLean County]] in the heart of the Illinois corn belt. Most of the Mennonites living in the area in the 1950s were farmers and members of the [[Central Conference Mennonite Church|Central Conference]]and the [[Fellowship of Evangelical Churches|Evangelical Mennonite Conference]], with churches in Normal, Meadows, [[Flanagan (Illinois, USA)|Flanagan]], Danvers, and [[Carlock Mennonite Church (Carlock, Illinois, USA)|Carlock]]. Mennonite institutions of the area included the [[Mennonite Hospital (Bloomington, Illinois, USA)|Mennonite Hospital]] at Bloomington, the [[Meadows Mennonite Home (Chenoa, Illinois, USA)|Old People's Home]] at Meadows, and the [[Salem Children's Home (Flanagan, Illinois, USA)|Salem Children's Orphanage]] at Flanagan.
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Bloomington, [[Illinois (USA)|Illinois]], is a city of over 33,000 population in 1953 (almost 75,000 in 2006) located in [[McLean County (Illinois, USA)|McLean County]] in the heart of the Illinois corn belt. Most of the Mennonites living in the area in the 1950s were farmers and members of the [[Central Conference Mennonite Church|Central Conference ]]and the [[Fellowship of Evangelical Churches|Evangelical Mennonite Conference]], with churches in Normal, Meadows, [[Flanagan (Illinois, USA)|Flanagan]], Danvers, and [[Carlock Mennonite Church (Carlock, Illinois, USA)|Carlock]]. Mennonite institutions of the area included the [[Mennonite Hospital (Bloomington, Illinois, USA)|Mennonite Hospital]] at Bloomington, the [[Meadows Mennonite Home (Chenoa, Illinois, USA)|Old People's Home]] at Meadows, and the [[Salem Children's Home (Flanagan, Illinois, USA)|Salem Children's Orphanage]] at Flanagan.
 
 
 
 
 
= Bibliography =
 
= Bibliography =
 
Weaver, William B. <em class="gameo_bibliography">History of the Central Conference Mennonite Church</em>. Danvers, IL: The Author, 1926.
 
Weaver, William B. <em class="gameo_bibliography">History of the Central Conference Mennonite Church</em>. Danvers, IL: The Author, 1926.
 
 
  
 
= Maps =
 
= Maps =
 
[[Map:Bloomington (Illinois)|Map:Bloomington (Illinois)]]
 
[[Map:Bloomington (Illinois)|Map:Bloomington (Illinois)]]
 
{{GAMEO_footer|hp=Vol. 1, p. 365|date=1953|a1_last=Troyer|a1_first=L. E|a2_last= |a2_first= }}
 
{{GAMEO_footer|hp=Vol. 1, p. 365|date=1953|a1_last=Troyer|a1_first=L. E|a2_last= |a2_first= }}

Latest revision as of 13:55, 23 August 2013

Bloomington, Illinois, is a city of over 33,000 population in 1953 (almost 75,000 in 2006) located in McLean County in the heart of the Illinois corn belt. Most of the Mennonites living in the area in the 1950s were farmers and members of the Central Conference and the Evangelical Mennonite Conference, with churches in Normal, Meadows, Flanagan, Danvers, and Carlock. Mennonite institutions of the area included the Mennonite Hospital at Bloomington, the Old People's Home at Meadows, and the Salem Children's Orphanage at Flanagan.

Bibliography

Weaver, William B. History of the Central Conference Mennonite Church. Danvers, IL: The Author, 1926.

Maps

Map:Bloomington (Illinois)


Author(s) L. E Troyer
Date Published 1953


Cite This Article

MLA style

Troyer, L. E. "Bloomington (Illinois, USA)." Global Anabaptist Mennonite Encyclopedia Online. 1953. Web. 26 Jan 2021. https://gameo.org/index.php?title=Bloomington_(Illinois,_USA)&oldid=91156.

APA style

Troyer, L. E. (1953). Bloomington (Illinois, USA). Global Anabaptist Mennonite Encyclopedia Online. Retrieved 26 January 2021, from https://gameo.org/index.php?title=Bloomington_(Illinois,_USA)&oldid=91156.




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Adapted by permission of Herald Press, Harrisonburg, Virginia, from Mennonite Encyclopedia, Vol. 1, p. 365. All rights reserved.


©1996-2021 by the Global Anabaptist Mennonite Encyclopedia Online. All rights reserved.