Difference between revisions of "Bethesda Home (Winkler, Manitoba, Canada)"

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In 1919 Mr. and Mrs. Jacob B. Hooge of [[Winkler (Manitoba, Canada)|Winkler]], [[Manitoba (Canada)|Manitoba]], started the Bethesda Home on their own account for the crippled, blind, aged, and others who sought shelter therein. It was non-denominational, but most of the residents, 21 at its peak, came from the various Mennonite church groups in the southern part of Manitoba, such as [[Bergthal Mennonites|Bergthaler]], [[Sommerfeld Mennonites|Sommerfelder]], [[Evangelical Mennonite Mission Conference (EMMC)|Rudnerweider]], [[Old Colony Mennonites|Old Colony]], and [[Mennonite Brethren Church|Mennonite Brethren]]. The maintenance of most of the inmates was financed by the various church groups named. The Bethesda Home ceased to exist in 1945, and after that time the building served as a dormitory and boardinghouse for male students at the Peniel Bible School, Winkler.
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In 1919 Mr. and Mrs. Jacob B. Hooge of [[Winkler (Manitoba, Canada)|Winkler]], [[Manitoba (Canada)|Manitoba]], started the Bethesda Home on their own account for the crippled, blind, aged, and others who sought shelter therein. It was non-denominational, but most of the residents, 21 at its peak, came from the various Mennonite church groups in the southern part of Manitoba, such as [[Bergthal Mennonites|Bergthaler]], [[Sommerfeld Mennonites|Sommerfelder]], [[Evangelical Mennonite Mission Conference (EMMC)|Rudnerweider]], [[Old Colony Mennonites|Old Colony]], and [[Mennonite Brethren Church|Mennonite Brethren]]. The maintenance of most of the inmates was financed by the various church groups named. The Bethesda Home ceased to exist in 1945, and after that time the building served as a dormitory and boardinghouse for male students at the [[Winkler Bible Institute (Winkler, Manitoba, Canada)|Winkler Bible School]], Winkler.
 
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{{GAMEO_footer|hp=Vol. 1, p. 315|date=1953|a1_last=Hamm|a1_first=H. H|a2_last= |a2_first= }}

Latest revision as of 06:53, 5 January 2021

In 1919 Mr. and Mrs. Jacob B. Hooge of Winkler, Manitoba, started the Bethesda Home on their own account for the crippled, blind, aged, and others who sought shelter therein. It was non-denominational, but most of the residents, 21 at its peak, came from the various Mennonite church groups in the southern part of Manitoba, such as Bergthaler, Sommerfelder, Rudnerweider, Old Colony, and Mennonite Brethren. The maintenance of most of the inmates was financed by the various church groups named. The Bethesda Home ceased to exist in 1945, and after that time the building served as a dormitory and boardinghouse for male students at the Winkler Bible School, Winkler.


Author(s) H. H Hamm
Date Published 1953

Cite This Article

MLA style

Hamm, H. H. "Bethesda Home (Winkler, Manitoba, Canada)." Global Anabaptist Mennonite Encyclopedia Online. 1953. Web. 22 Oct 2021. https://gameo.org/index.php?title=Bethesda_Home_(Winkler,_Manitoba,_Canada)&oldid=169717.

APA style

Hamm, H. H. (1953). Bethesda Home (Winkler, Manitoba, Canada). Global Anabaptist Mennonite Encyclopedia Online. Retrieved 22 October 2021, from https://gameo.org/index.php?title=Bethesda_Home_(Winkler,_Manitoba,_Canada)&oldid=169717.




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Adapted by permission of Herald Press, Harrisonburg, Virginia, from Mennonite Encyclopedia, Vol. 1, p. 315. All rights reserved.


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