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Thomas Wopkens (b. 1700 at Leeuwarden, d. 1775 at Harlingen), was trained for the ministry at the Remonstrant seminary at Amsterdam. He served in the Amsterdam Lamist congregation 1726-1729 and at Harlingen 1729-46. Wopkens was a man of great knowledge and learning; he published a critical edition in Latin of the works of Cicero, entitled Lectionum Tulliarum . . . Libri tres (Amsterdam, 1730) and Dutch translations of some Latin works on theology. He was a man of liberal views and co-operated closely with his Harlingen copastor Johannes Stinstra. His poor health forced him to resign at a rather early age.


Bibliography

Cate, Steven Blaupot ten. Geschiedenis der Doopsgezinden in Friesland. Leeuwarden: W. Eekhoff, 1839: 237.

Doopsgezind Jaarboekje (1840): 113.

Hoop Scheffer, Jacob Gijsbert de. Inventaris der Archiefstukken berustende bij de Vereenigde Doopsgezinde Gemeente to Amsterdam, 2 vols. Amsterdam: Uitgegeven en ten geschenke aangeboden door den Kerkeraad dier Gemeente, 1883-1884: I, No. 669.

Sepp, Chr. Johannes Stinstra en zijn tijd. Amsterdam, 1865-66: I, 210 f.; II, 141, 147.



Author(s) Nanne van der Zijpp
Date Published 1959


Cite This Article

MLA style

van der Zijpp, Nanne. "Wopkens, Thomas (1700-1775)." Global Anabaptist Mennonite Encyclopedia Online. 1959. Web. 24 Oct 2014. http://gameo.org/index.php?title=Wopkens,_Thomas_(1700-1775)&oldid=69353.

APA style

van der Zijpp, Nanne. (1959). Wopkens, Thomas (1700-1775). Global Anabaptist Mennonite Encyclopedia Online. Retrieved 24 October 2014, from http://gameo.org/index.php?title=Wopkens,_Thomas_(1700-1775)&oldid=69353.




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Adapted by permission of Herald Press, Harrisonburg, Virginia, and Waterloo, Ontario, from Mennonite Encyclopedia, Vol. 4, p. 978. All rights reserved. For information on ordering the encyclopedia visit the Herald Press website.


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