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[[File:WinklerPrinsA.jpg|300px|thumb|right|''A. Winkler Prins  
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[[File:WinklerPrinsA.jpg|300px|thumb|right|''A. Winkler Prins
  
Doopsgezind Jaarboekje  
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Doopsgezind Jaarboekje
  
(1909)  
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(1909)'']]    Anthony Winkler Prins, born 31 January 1817, at Voorst, [[Netherlands|Netherlands]], died 4 January 1908, at Voorburg, studied theology at the University of Utrecht and the [[Amsterdam Mennonite Theological Seminary (Kweekschool)|Am­sterdam Mennonite seminary]] and was a pastor at [[Tjalleberd (Friesland, Netherlands)|Tjalleberd]] 1841-50 and Veendam 1850-82, retiring in this year. He published a volume of sermons, <em>Leerre denen</em> (Heerenveen, 1851), and his farewell ser­mon, <em>Afscheidsrede,</em> from Veendam (Wildervank, 1882). But more than a theologian, Winkler Prins was a literary man; during his student years in [[Amsterdam (Noord-Holland, Netherlands)|Am­sterdam]], he—with H. C. Dronrijp Uges, [[Harting, Dirk (1817-1892)|D. Harting]], [[Leendertz, Pieter (1817-1880)|P. Leendertz]], and [[Hoop Scheffer, Jacob Gijsbert de (1819-1894)|J. G. de Hoop Scheffer]]—was a co-founder of the literary club N.E.K., and in 1842-44 he published the periodical <em>Braga</em>, in which he and his friends sharply criticized the low level of contemporary Dutch literature. From 1838 Prins published articles in many Dutch literary periodicals and newspapers. He also published poems. The complete, long list of his writings is found in the <em>Levensbericht</em> (obituary) of the Dutch Association for Literature, of which he was a member. His chief publication is the Dutch illustrated encyclopedia (<em>Winkler Prins Encyclopedic)</em> in 16 vv. (Amster­dam, 1869-82; 6th revised edition at Amsterdam 1947-55), for which he did painstaking work.
 
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'']]    Anthony Winkler Prins, born 31 January 1817, at Voorst, [[Netherlands|Netherlands]], died 4 January 1908, at Voorburg, studied theology at the University of Utrecht and the [[Amsterdam Mennonite Theological Seminary (Kweekschool)|Am­sterdam Mennonite seminary]] and was a pastor at [[Tjalleberd (Friesland, Netherlands)|Tjalleberd]] 1841-50 and Veendam 1850-82, retiring in this year. He published a volume of sermons, <em>Leerre denen</em> (Heerenveen, 1851), and his farewell ser­mon, <em>Afscheidsrede,</em> from Veendam (Wildervank, 1882). But more than a theologian, Winkler Prins was a literary man; during his student years in [[Amsterdam (Noord-Holland, Netherlands)|Am­sterdam]], he—with H. C. Dronrijp Uges, [[Harting, Dirk (1817-1892)|D. Harting]], [[Leendertz, Pieter (1817-1880)|P. Leendertz]], and [[Hoop Scheffer, Jacob Gijsbert de (1819-1894)|J. G. de Hoop Scheffer]]—was a co-founder of the literary club N.E.K., and in 1842-44 he published the periodical <em>Braga</em>, in which he and his friends sharply criticized the low level of contemporary Dutch literature. From 1838 Prins published articles in many Dutch literary periodicals and newspapers. He also published poems. The complete, long list of his writings is found in the <em>Levensbericht</em> (obituary) of the Dutch Association for Literature, of which he was a member. His chief publication is the Dutch illustrated encyclopedia (<em>Winkler Prins Encyclopedic)</em> in 16 vv. (Amster­dam, 1869-82; 6th revised edition at Amsterdam 1947-55), for which he did painstaking work.
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Winkler Prins was a versatile man. Particularly during his Veendam period he was "the intellectual pioneer" of this area, successfully promoting better schools in Veendam, the improvement of agricul­tural methods, and many other public interests. In 1864 he was chosen as a member of the Second Chamber of Parliament, but declined.
 
Winkler Prins was a versatile man. Particularly during his Veendam period he was "the intellectual pioneer" of this area, successfully promoting better schools in Veendam, the improvement of agricul­tural methods, and many other public interests. In 1864 he was chosen as a member of the Second Chamber of Parliament, but declined.

Revision as of 14:54, 23 August 2013

A. Winkler Prins Doopsgezind Jaarboekje (1909)
Anthony Winkler Prins, born 31 January 1817, at Voorst, Netherlands, died 4 January 1908, at Voorburg, studied theology at the University of Utrecht and the Am­sterdam Mennonite seminary and was a pastor at Tjalleberd 1841-50 and Veendam 1850-82, retiring in this year. He published a volume of sermons, Leerre denen (Heerenveen, 1851), and his farewell ser­mon, Afscheidsrede, from Veendam (Wildervank, 1882). But more than a theologian, Winkler Prins was a literary man; during his student years in Am­sterdam, he—with H. C. Dronrijp Uges, D. Harting, P. Leendertz, and J. G. de Hoop Scheffer—was a co-founder of the literary club N.E.K., and in 1842-44 he published the periodical Braga, in which he and his friends sharply criticized the low level of contemporary Dutch literature. From 1838 Prins published articles in many Dutch literary periodicals and newspapers. He also published poems. The complete, long list of his writings is found in the Levensbericht (obituary) of the Dutch Association for Literature, of which he was a member. His chief publication is the Dutch illustrated encyclopedia (Winkler Prins Encyclopedic) in 16 vv. (Amster­dam, 1869-82; 6th revised edition at Amsterdam 1947-55), for which he did painstaking work.

Winkler Prins was a versatile man. Particularly during his Veendam period he was "the intellectual pioneer" of this area, successfully promoting better schools in Veendam, the improvement of agricul­tural methods, and many other public interests. In 1864 he was chosen as a member of the Second Chamber of Parliament, but declined.

Anthony Winkler Prins was the son of (M.D.) Jacob Prins and Johanna van Marie Winkler. In 1847 he was married to H. R. Klijnsma. H. A. Lunshof wrote a biographical novel on the life of Wink­ler Prins, entitled Leven zonder demon (Amster­dam, 1950).

Bibliography

Doopsgezinde Bijdragen (1864): 170; (1908): 207.

Doopsgezind Jaarboekje (1909): 21-33 (with portrait).

Dyserinck, J. Levensbericht van A. Winkler Prins.  Lei­den, 1909.

Molhuysen, P. C. and  P. J. Blok. Nieuw Nederlandsch Biografisch Woordenboek. 10 vols. Leiden, 1911-1937: v. V, 538-40.


Author(s) Nanne van der Zijpp
Date Published 1959


Cite This Article

MLA style

van der Zijpp, Nanne. "Winkler Prins, Anthony (1817-1908)." Global Anabaptist Mennonite Encyclopedia Online. 1959. Web. 21 Nov 2014. http://gameo.org/index.php?title=Winkler_Prins,_Anthony_(1817-1908)&oldid=96883.

APA style

van der Zijpp, Nanne. (1959). Winkler Prins, Anthony (1817-1908). Global Anabaptist Mennonite Encyclopedia Online. Retrieved 21 November 2014, from http://gameo.org/index.php?title=Winkler_Prins,_Anthony_(1817-1908)&oldid=96883.




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Adapted by permission of Herald Press, Harrisonburg, Virginia, and Waterloo, Ontario, from Mennonite Encyclopedia, Vol. 4, pp. 960-961. All rights reserved. For information on ordering the encyclopedia visit the Herald Press website.


©1996-2014 by the Global Anabaptist Mennonite Encyclopedia Online. All rights reserved.