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[[File:AMC_X-31-1_17_29.jpg|300px|thumb|right|''Willow Springs Mennonite Church, 1946
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Scan courtesy [http://www.mcusa-archives.org/Archives/GuideAMC.html Mennonite Church
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[[File:AMC_X-31-1_17_29.jpg|400px|thumb|right|''Willow Springs Mennonite Church, 1946</br>Scan courtesy [http://www.mennoniteusa.org/executive-board/archives/ Mennonite Church USA Archives-Goshen] X-31.1, Box 17/28'']]
 
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[[File:WillowSpringsMennoniteChurchTiskilwa.jpg|400px|thumbnail|''Willow Springs Mennonite Church, Tiskilwa, IL.<br />
USA Archives-Goshen]
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Source: [http://www.willowsprings.il.us.mennonite.net/ Church website]''.]]
 
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Willow Springs Mennonite Church ([[Mennonite Church (MC)|Mennonite Church]]), located 4 miles south of Tiskilwa, [[Bureau County (Illinois, USA)|Bureau County]], [[Illinois (USA)|Illinois]], a mem­ber of the [[Illinois Mennonite Conference (Mennonite Church USA) |Illinois Mennonite Conference]], was organized in 1836 as an [[Amish Mennonites|Amish Mennonite]] congregation, the settlers having come mostly from [[Bayern Federal State (Germany)|Bavaria]], [[Germany|Germany]], plus a few from [[Butler County (Ohio, USA)|Butler County]], [[Ohio (USA)|Ohio]]. The Bavarians had first settled in 1835 in the Hennepin and Gran­ville neighborhood in [[Putnam County (Ohio, USA)|Putnam County]]. After meet­ing in homes for 35 years the congregation built its first meetinghouse in 1873. This was destroyed by lightning in 1896, but was immediately rebuilt, and later enlarged several times.
X-31.1, Box 17/28'']]     Willow Springs Mennonite Church ([[Mennonite Church (MC)|Mennonite Church]]), located 4 miles south of Tiskilwa, [[Bureau County (Illinois, USA)|Bureau County]], [[Illinois (USA)|Illinois]], a mem­ber of the [[Illinois Mennonite Conference (Mennonite Church USA) |Illinois Mennonite Conference]], was organized in 1836 as an [[Amish Mennonites|Amish Mennonite]] congregation, the settlers having come mostly from [[Bayern Federal State (Germany)|Bavaria]], [[Germany|Germany]], plus a few from [[Butler County (Ohio, USA)|Butler County]], [[Ohio (State)|Ohio]]. The Bavarians had first settled in 1835 in the Hennepin and Gran­ville neighborhood in [[Putnam County (Ohio, USA)|Putnam County]]. After meet­ing in homes for 35 years the congregation built its first meetinghouse in 1873. This was destroyed by lightning in 1896, but was immediately rebuilt, and later enlarged several times.
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Three subsidiary groups have been formed from Willow Springs: Ohio Station in the north central part of the county 1840-1915, which never developed into a congregation; [[Rockwell Mennonite Church (Sheffield, Illinois, USA)|Sheffield]] in the western part of the county 1943-1950; and the [[Tiskilwa Mennonite Church (Tiskilwa, Illinois, USA)|Tiskilwa Mennonite Church]] ([[General Conference Mennonite Church (GCM)|General Conference Mennonite]]), which was formed in 1911 when a group withdrew to join the [[Central Conference Mennonite Church|Central Illinois Mennonite Conference]].
 
Three subsidiary groups have been formed from Willow Springs: Ohio Station in the north central part of the county 1840-1915, which never developed into a congregation; [[Rockwell Mennonite Church (Sheffield, Illinois, USA)|Sheffield]] in the western part of the county 1943-1950; and the [[Tiskilwa Mennonite Church (Tiskilwa, Illinois, USA)|Tiskilwa Mennonite Church]] ([[General Conference Mennonite Church (GCM)|General Conference Mennonite]]), which was formed in 1911 when a group withdrew to join the [[Central Conference Mennonite Church|Central Illinois Mennonite Conference]].
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The first minister in the Hennepin community was Jacob Burkey of Hesse, Germany, who never lived in the Tiskilwa neighborhood. The Willow Springs congregation suffered for many years from inadequate and even absentee ministerial leadership and was not established on a sound basis until 1868, when Joseph Burkey, a minister at Tremont, Illinois, moved in and was ordained bishop a year later. His successor was C. A. Hartzler, a minister from Garden City, [[Missouri (USA)|Missouri]], who came in 1913 and was or­dained bishop a year later. C. W. Long was pastor in 1957, with a membership of 142.
 
The first minister in the Hennepin community was Jacob Burkey of Hesse, Germany, who never lived in the Tiskilwa neighborhood. The Willow Springs congregation suffered for many years from inadequate and even absentee ministerial leadership and was not established on a sound basis until 1868, when Joseph Burkey, a minister at Tremont, Illinois, moved in and was ordained bishop a year later. His successor was C. A. Hartzler, a minister from Garden City, [[Missouri (USA)|Missouri]], who came in 1913 and was or­dained bishop a year later. C. W. Long was pastor in 1957, with a membership of 142.
 
= Bibliography =
 
= Bibliography =
Weber, H. F. <em>Centennial History of the Mennonites of Illinois</em>. Goshen,  IN.: The Mennonite Historical Society, 1931: 222-36.
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Weber, Harry F. <em>Centennial History of the Mennonites of Illinois</em>. Goshen, Ind.: The Mennonite Historical Society, 1931: 222-36.
 
= Additional Information =
 
= Additional Information =
<strong>Address</strong>: 16621 Kentville Road, Tiskilwa, IL 61368.
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'''Address''': PO Box 386, Tiskilwa, IL 61368-0386
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<strong>Location</strong>: 16621 Kentville Road, Tiskilwa, IL 61368.
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<strong>Telephone</strong>: 815-646-4287
  
<strong>Telephone</strong>: 815-646-4287.
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'''Website''': [http://www.willowsprings.il.us.mennonite.net/ Willow Springs Mennonite Church]
 
{{GAMEO_footer|hp=Vol. 4, p. 958|date=1959|a1_last=Bender|a1_first=Harold S|a2_last=|a2_first=}}
 
{{GAMEO_footer|hp=Vol. 4, p. 958|date=1959|a1_last=Bender|a1_first=Harold S|a2_last=|a2_first=}}
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[[Category:Churches]]
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[[Category:Western Amish Mennonite Conference Congregations]]
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[[Category:Illinois Mennonite Conference Congregations]]
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[[Category:Mennonite Church USA Congregations]]
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[[Category:Mennonite Church (MC) Congregations]]

Latest revision as of 01:52, 31 March 2014

Contents

Willow Springs Mennonite Church, 1946
Scan courtesy Mennonite Church USA Archives-Goshen X-31.1, Box 17/28
Willow Springs Mennonite Church, Tiskilwa, IL.
Source: Church website
.

Willow Springs Mennonite Church (Mennonite Church), located 4 miles south of Tiskilwa, Bureau County, Illinois, a mem­ber of the Illinois Mennonite Conference, was organized in 1836 as an Amish Mennonite congregation, the settlers having come mostly from Bavaria, Germany, plus a few from Butler County, Ohio. The Bavarians had first settled in 1835 in the Hennepin and Gran­ville neighborhood in Putnam County. After meet­ing in homes for 35 years the congregation built its first meetinghouse in 1873. This was destroyed by lightning in 1896, but was immediately rebuilt, and later enlarged several times.

Three subsidiary groups have been formed from Willow Springs: Ohio Station in the north central part of the county 1840-1915, which never developed into a congregation; Sheffield in the western part of the county 1943-1950; and the Tiskilwa Mennonite Church (General Conference Mennonite), which was formed in 1911 when a group withdrew to join the Central Illinois Mennonite Conference.

The first minister in the Hennepin community was Jacob Burkey of Hesse, Germany, who never lived in the Tiskilwa neighborhood. The Willow Springs congregation suffered for many years from inadequate and even absentee ministerial leadership and was not established on a sound basis until 1868, when Joseph Burkey, a minister at Tremont, Illinois, moved in and was ordained bishop a year later. His successor was C. A. Hartzler, a minister from Garden City, Missouri, who came in 1913 and was or­dained bishop a year later. C. W. Long was pastor in 1957, with a membership of 142.

[edit] Bibliography

Weber, Harry F. Centennial History of the Mennonites of Illinois. Goshen, Ind.: The Mennonite Historical Society, 1931: 222-36.

[edit] Additional Information

Address: PO Box 386, Tiskilwa, IL 61368-0386

Location: 16621 Kentville Road, Tiskilwa, IL 61368.

Telephone: 815-646-4287

Website: Willow Springs Mennonite Church


Author(s) Harold S Bender
Date Published 1959


[edit] Cite This Article

MLA style

Bender, Harold S. "Willow Springs Mennonite Church (Tiskilwa, Illinois, USA)." Global Anabaptist Mennonite Encyclopedia Online. 1959. Web. 26 May 2015. http://gameo.org/index.php?title=Willow_Springs_Mennonite_Church_(Tiskilwa,_Illinois,_USA)&oldid=116975.

APA style

Bender, Harold S. (1959). Willow Springs Mennonite Church (Tiskilwa, Illinois, USA). Global Anabaptist Mennonite Encyclopedia Online. Retrieved 26 May 2015, from http://gameo.org/index.php?title=Willow_Springs_Mennonite_Church_(Tiskilwa,_Illinois,_USA)&oldid=116975.




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Adapted by permission of Herald Press, Harrisonburg, Virginia, and Waterloo, Ontario, from Mennonite Encyclopedia, Vol. 4, p. 958. All rights reserved. For information on ordering the encyclopedia visit the Herald Press website.


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