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Walnut Grove Amish Mennonite Church (now extinct) was formed in Logan County, Ohio, by that part of the Logan County Mennonites who adhered to the more progressive discipline of John Warye, bishop at Oak Grove in Champaign County, and David Plank, preacher at Walnut Grove. They built a meetinghouse about three miles west of the South Union Mennonite Church. David S. Yoder, farmer-schoolteacher and prominent Sunday-school worker and mission committee man, was a member of this congregation. In 1885, when John P. King, bishop at South Union, moved to Hartford, Kansas, it was decided to place both David Plank and Christian K. Yoder, preacher at South Union, in the lot and that whichever was chosen was to be bishop of both congregations. David Plank was chosen and ordained. Then for several years services alternated at the two churches, but in 1929 services were discontinued at Walnut Grove and the plot reverted to the original owners. The former church building is now an implement shed.

[edit] Bibliography

Umble, John. "Early Sunday Schools at West Liberty, Ohio." Mennonite Quarterly Review 4 (1930): 6-50, passim.


Author(s) John S Umble
Date Published 1959


[edit] Cite This Article

MLA style

Umble, John S. "Walnut Grove Amish Mennonite Church (Logan County, Ohio, USA)." Global Anabaptist Mennonite Encyclopedia Online. 1959. Web. 18 Apr 2014. http://gameo.org/index.php?title=Walnut_Grove_Amish_Mennonite_Church_(Logan_County,_Ohio,_USA)&oldid=113678.

APA style

Umble, John S. (1959). Walnut Grove Amish Mennonite Church (Logan County, Ohio, USA). Global Anabaptist Mennonite Encyclopedia Online. Retrieved 18 April 2014, from http://gameo.org/index.php?title=Walnut_Grove_Amish_Mennonite_Church_(Logan_County,_Ohio,_USA)&oldid=113678.




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Adapted by permission of Herald Press, Harrisonburg, Virginia, and Waterloo, Ontario, from Mennonite Encyclopedia, Vol. 4, p. 880. All rights reserved. For information on ordering the encyclopedia visit the Herald Press website.


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