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Vogelstock is a town near Landau in the Palatinate, Ger­many. A Mennonite congregation of Bachlingen-Vogelstock is mentioned in the Dutch Naamlijst from 1767. Its preachers were Johannes Ellenberger 1754-d.ca. 1785, Philip Sties until ca. 1769, Johann Bergserving 1763-after 1802, Jacob Sties(s) from 1769, Daniel van Huben (?) 1782–ca. 1788, and Jacob Sautor 1787-after 1802. Elders of this congregation were Daniel Hirschler, living at the Geisberg, until 1769, at the same time elder of the Schafbusch congregation, and 1769-85 Christian Hege of the Branchweilerhof. In 1785 preacher Stiess was chosen as elder, serving until after 1802. In the Naamlijst of 1784 and following editions this congrega­tion is listed as Bachlingen-Vogelstock-Sankt Johanneskirchen. In the 19th century it was called Sankt Johann or Johanniskirchen. The Namensverzeichnis (Danzig, 1857: 37) mentions preachers Jacob Zorger and Jacob Res serving from 1851, and Jacob Riess, also serving from 1859. The congregation then numbered 70 baptized members. In 1887 (Mannhardt, Jahrbuch 1888, p. 28, No. 14) it numbered 40 souls, with Jacob Zörger as preacher.


Author(s) Nanne van der Zijpp
Date Published 1959


Cite This Article

MLA style

Zijpp, Nanne van der. "Vogelstock (Rheinland-Pfalz, Germany)." Global Anabaptist Mennonite Encyclopedia Online. 1959. Web. 25 Apr 2014. http://gameo.org/index.php?title=Vogelstock_(Rheinland-Pfalz,_Germany)&oldid=109633.

APA style

Zijpp, Nanne van der. (1959). Vogelstock (Rheinland-Pfalz, Germany). Global Anabaptist Mennonite Encyclopedia Online. Retrieved 25 April 2014, from http://gameo.org/index.php?title=Vogelstock_(Rheinland-Pfalz,_Germany)&oldid=109633.




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Adapted by permission of Herald Press, Harrisonburg, Virginia, and Waterloo, Ontario, from Mennonite Encyclopedia, Vol. 4, p. 841. All rights reserved. For information on ordering the encyclopedia visit the Herald Press website.


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