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Cornelis de Vogel (Cornelis Leonardsz), a member of the Lamist Mennonite congregation at Amster­dam, Holland, who moved to Danzig, Prussia, in 1726 for his banking business. He presented a letter of membership to the Danzig Mennonite Schladall congregation, but he was refused in 1727 because he wore a periwig. Thereupon de Vogel asked admis­sion to the Markushof congregation in 1728, but was rejected there too. These refusals, which were particularly due to the conservatism of the Danzig elder Hendrik (Heinrich) van Dühren, caused much trouble in the Danzig congregation. In 1735 de Vogel had not yet been admitted as a member.

Cornelis de Vogel Leonardsz, as well as his father-in-law Jan van Hoek and his brother-in-law Jan van Hoek, both of whom were Danzig bankers, served as mediators between the Prussian Mennon­ites and the Dutch Mennonite Committee for For­eign Needs.

[edit] Bibliography

Hoop Scheffer, Jacob Gijsbert de. Inventaris der Archiefstukken berustende bij de Vereenigde Doopsgezinde Gemeente to Amsterdam, 2 vols. Amsterdam: Uitgegeven en ten geschenke aangeboden door den Kerkeraad dier Gemeente, 1883-1884: v. I, Nos. 1235, 1624, 1628, 1632, 1639, 1642, 1648, 1650; v. II, 2, Nos. 2634 f, 2640 f.


Author(s) Nanne van der Zijpp
Date Published 1959


[edit] Cite This Article

MLA style

Zijpp, Nanne van der. "Vogel, Cornelis de (18th century)." Global Anabaptist Mennonite Encyclopedia Online. 1959. Web. 12 Jul 2014. http://gameo.org/index.php?title=Vogel,_Cornelis_de_(18th_century)&oldid=109629.

APA style

Zijpp, Nanne van der. (1959). Vogel, Cornelis de (18th century). Global Anabaptist Mennonite Encyclopedia Online. Retrieved 12 July 2014, from http://gameo.org/index.php?title=Vogel,_Cornelis_de_(18th_century)&oldid=109629.




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Adapted by permission of Herald Press, Harrisonburg, Virginia, and Waterloo, Ontario, from Mennonite Encyclopedia, Vol. 4, p. 840. All rights reserved. For information on ordering the encyclopedia visit the Herald Press website.


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