From GAMEO
Jump to: navigation, search

Visscher, a common Dutch family name, Mennonite as well as non-Mennonite. Jan Visscher (born 1801 at Blokzijl, died 14 August 1882, at Utrecht) was a Men­nonite minister, educated at the Amsterdam semi­nary and pastor of Hengelo 1824-28 and Utrecht from 1828-61. He wrote a paper against the modern (liberal) theology of J. H. Scholten, professor at Leiden, found in Jaarboeken voor Wetenschappelijke Theologie VIII, 1850, separately reprinted un­der the title Brief aan een' Doopsgezinden broeder over den Heiligen Doop (Utrecht, 1851); with his colleague D. S. Gorter he had a debate on the same question. He also published Een woord van Troost, a sermon (Haarlem, 1859), Tweetal Leerredenen (Haarlem, 1859), and a few other sermons. In the Doopsgezinde Bijdragen of 1876 he published a paper on the question whether persons who had been admitted into Mennonite congregations with­out baptism should be accepted by other Mennonite congregations. In an era of growing liberalism among the Dutch Mennonites Visscher was a cham­pion of the conservative suprarationalist views. His son Jan Visscher (b. 1829 at Utrecht, d. 27 April 1885, at Akkrum) was a Mennonite pastor at Akkrum 1855-d.1885. Both father and son Jan Visscher were trustees of the Algemeene Doopsgezinde Sociëteit. Alle Visscher was not related to them.

[edit] Bibliography

Berghuys, H. B. Geschiedenis der Doopsgezinde gemeente te Utrecht. 1926: 80 f., 84.


Author(s) Nanne van der Zijpp
Date Published 1959


[edit] Cite This Article

MLA style

Zijpp, Nanne van der. "Visscher family name." Global Anabaptist Mennonite Encyclopedia Online. 1959. Web. 1 Sep 2016. http://gameo.org/index.php?title=Visscher_family_name&oldid=133615.

APA style

Zijpp, Nanne van der. (1959). Visscher family name. Global Anabaptist Mennonite Encyclopedia Online. Retrieved 1 September 2016, from http://gameo.org/index.php?title=Visscher_family_name&oldid=133615.




Hpbuttns.gif
Adapted by permission of Herald Press, Harrisonburg, Virginia, and Kitchener, Ontario, from Mennonite Encyclopedia, Vol. 4, p. 835. All rights reserved.


©1996-2016 by the Global Anabaptist Mennonite Encyclopedia Online. All rights reserved.