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Jan Tjerks Vermanje (b. ca. 1743 at Midlum near Harlingen, d. 17 December 1829, at Den Horn), was an untrained Dutch Mennonite preacher for more than 61 years. His start as a preacher was rather unusual: he was the servant of a farmer at Witveen in Friesland, who was a minister of the church; one Sunday when his master was ill, Ver­manje preached in his place (a somewhat different account in Doopsgezinde Bijdragen 1901, 104, note). His testimony gave such satisfaction that the congregation chose him as preacher in 1762. He served at Witveen until 1782, and though he had a very poor education, being even unable to write, he seems to have been a rather eloquent speaker: in 1782 he was called to the Mildam-Knijpe congregation, where he served for ten years. Here he adopted his family name Vermanje, because he was living in a room of the vermaning (meetinghouse, Frisian formanje). On 27 December 1791, he preached the last sermon in the Old Flemish meetinghouse at Beneden-Knijpe, which was then pulled down. Finally he served at Den Horn from 1792 until his death. In his last years, unable to walk, he was carried to the pulpit.

[edit] Bibliography

Doopsgezinde Bijdragen (1872): 39 f.

Doopsgezind Jaarboekje (1837): 34.

Molhuysen, P. C. and  P. J. Blok. Nieuw Nederlandsch Biografisch Woordenboek, 10 vols. Leiden, 1911-1937: III, 1295.


Author(s) Nanne van der Zijpp
Date Published 1959


[edit] Cite This Article

MLA style

van der Zijpp, Nanne. "Vermanje, Jan Tjerks (ca. 1743-1829)." Global Anabaptist Mennonite Encyclopedia Online. 1959. Web. 20 Aug 2014. http://gameo.org/index.php?title=Vermanje,_Jan_Tjerks_(ca._1743-1829)&oldid=96758.

APA style

van der Zijpp, Nanne. (1959). Vermanje, Jan Tjerks (ca. 1743-1829). Global Anabaptist Mennonite Encyclopedia Online. Retrieved 20 August 2014, from http://gameo.org/index.php?title=Vermanje,_Jan_Tjerks_(ca._1743-1829)&oldid=96758.




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Adapted by permission of Herald Press, Harrisonburg, Virginia, and Waterloo, Ontario, from Mennonite Encyclopedia, Vol. 4, pp. 815-816. All rights reserved. For information on ordering the encyclopedia visit the Herald Press website.


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