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The Vancouver Persian Christian Church began in the late 1980s. The congregation became a member of the British Columbia (BC) Conference of Mennonite Brethren (MB) Churches in 1999. At that time it was reported that the church had a membership of 27 and an attendance of 45. Seervan Dowlati, a Kurd from Iran, had led the church since 1990 and became the full-time pastor in 2000. Dowlati died in May 2002 and Faheem Moini became pastor of the congregation later that year. At the BC MB Conference annual convention in April 2004 it was reported that the church had closed within the last year.

[edit] Bibliography

Mennonite Brethren Herald (May 28, 1999) http://old.mbconf.ca/mb/mbh3811/bc.htm (accessed 27 August 2009); (June 9, 2000) http://old.mbherald.com/39-12/news-1.html (accessed 19 May 2008); (February 28, 2003) http://www.mbherald.com/42/03/profile.en.html (accessed 27 August 2009); (11 June 2004) http://www.mbherald.com/43/08/news-1.en.html (accessed 27 August 2009).

[edit] Additional Information

Denominational Affiliations:

British Columbia Conference of Mennonite Brethren Churches (1999-2003)

Canadian Conference of Mennonite Brethren Churches (1999-2003)

General Conference of Mennonite Brethren Churches (1999-2003)


Author(s) Richard D Thiessen
Date Published December 2009


[edit] Cite This Article

MLA style

Thiessen, Richard D. "Vancouver Persian Christian Church (North Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada)." Global Anabaptist Mennonite Encyclopedia Online. December 2009. Web. 3 Sep 2014. http://gameo.org/index.php?title=Vancouver_Persian_Christian_Church_(North_Vancouver,_British_Columbia,_Canada)&oldid=85654.

APA style

Thiessen, Richard D. (December 2009). Vancouver Persian Christian Church (North Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada). Global Anabaptist Mennonite Encyclopedia Online. Retrieved 3 September 2014, from http://gameo.org/index.php?title=Vancouver_Persian_Christian_Church_(North_Vancouver,_British_Columbia,_Canada)&oldid=85654.




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