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In 2008 Andrew and Rebecca Stanley, church planters with the British Columbia (BC) Conference of Mennonite Brethren (MB) Churches Board of Church Extension, moved into the Dunbar area of Vancouver to begin the work of planting a Mennonite Brethren church. In the fall of 2008 the Stanleys were recognized by the University of British Columbia as university chaplains for Mennonite Brethren students at the university, with Rebecca taking on the primary role in this assignment. In 2009 the congregation became a member of the BC Conference of MB Churches. Also in that year the church plant began meeting on Sunday evenings at the Menno Simons Centre.

In 2010 the congregation had an average weekly attendance of 45.

On 31 March 2012 Urban Journey closed. Financial assistance could no longer be offered by the church planting board of the BC MB Conference and the church, made up primarily of students and young families, did not have the resources to support the continuation of the church.

Bibliography

Mennonite Brethren Herald (May 2012): 33.

Additional Information

Denominational Affiliations:

British Columbia Conference of Mennonite Brethren Churches (2009-2012)

Canadian Conference of Mennonite Brethren Churches (2009-2012)


Author(s) Richard D Thiessen
Date Published May 2012


Cite This Article

MLA style

Thiessen, Richard D. "Urban Journey (Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada)." Global Anabaptist Mennonite Encyclopedia Online. May 2012. Web. 21 Sep 2014. http://gameo.org/index.php?title=Urban_Journey_(Vancouver,_British_Columbia,_Canada)&oldid=122060.

APA style

Thiessen, Richard D. (May 2012). Urban Journey (Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada). Global Anabaptist Mennonite Encyclopedia Online. Retrieved 21 September 2014, from http://gameo.org/index.php?title=Urban_Journey_(Vancouver,_British_Columbia,_Canada)&oldid=122060.




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