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United Orphanage and Mission was organized in 1901, for the purpose of promoting and supporting the orphanage work that had been begun among the Armenians in Turkey in 1898 by Rose Lambert of Indiana and Anna Gerber of Ohio. By 1901 scores of Armenian orphans were being supported by friends from America and Europe. In 1911 there were two orphanage institutions, one for boys at Everek and one for girls at Hadjin, Turkey, with 306 orphans.

During World War I the orphanage buildings were burned by the Moslem Turks, and the Armenians scattered, but the successors of the mission continued until 1938 to minister to the Armenian remnant which migrated to Syria. What remains of this good work is now in the charge of the Spiritual Brotherhood, an indigenous Armenian organization whose head is Abraham Sefarian, with headquarters in Aleppo, Syria, and Beirut, Lebanon, but with groups scattered into various countries, including Africa, Cyprus, the United States, and South America. This movement was really interdenominational, but the board members as well as the missionaries were chiefly of the United Missionary Church from the United States and Canada. In 1932 the United Orphanage was disbanded, and the work was transferred to the United Missionary Society.


Author(s) J. A Huffman
Date Published 1959


Cite This Article

MLA style

Huffman, J. A. "United Orphanage and Mission." Global Anabaptist Mennonite Encyclopedia Online. 1959. Web. 18 Apr 2014. http://gameo.org/index.php?title=United_Orphanage_and_Mission&oldid=78402.

APA style

Huffman, J. A. (1959). United Orphanage and Mission. Global Anabaptist Mennonite Encyclopedia Online. Retrieved 18 April 2014, from http://gameo.org/index.php?title=United_Orphanage_and_Mission&oldid=78402.




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Adapted by permission of Herald Press, Harrisonburg, Virginia, and Waterloo, Ontario, from Mennonite Encyclopedia, Vol. 4, p. 776. All rights reserved. For information on ordering the encyclopedia visit the Herald Press website.


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