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Tschetter (Czeterle), a [[Hutterian Brethren (Hutterische Brüder)|Hutterite]] family name. In 1760 Abraham Tschetter at [[Sobotište (Trnavský kraj, Slovakia)|Sobotište]], [[Hungary|Hungary]], vigorously opposed a [[Jesuits (1957)|Jesuit]] who had been sent by the government to catholicize the Hutterian Brethren and who was preaching in their meetinghouse. Tschetter was soon arrested and taken to Erlau, about 50 miles from the [[Bruderhof|Bruderhof]], and imprisoned in the Jesuit monastery prison. Here he gave up his faith and became [[Roman Catholic Church|Catholic]]. Lorenz Tschetter was imprisoned in 1766 at Alwinc, Hungary, for his faith. Upon his release in 1767 he went to [[Walachia (Romania)|Walachia]] with the rest of the Bruderhof, and from there to [[Russia|Russia]], where the family increased. [[Tschetter, Paul (1842-1919)|Paul]] and Lorentz Tschetter were among the twelve delegates from several Mennonite branches in Russia who came to the [[United States of America|United States]] and [[Canada|Canada]] in 1873 to look for land and in 1874 led some 40 families to Dakota. Paul Tschetter became a leader of the group that joined the [[Krimmer Mennonite Brethren|Krimmer Mennonite Brethren]] (KMB) Church. His son J. W. Tschetter was long a KMB city missionary in Chicago.
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Tschetter (Czeterle), a [[Hutterian Brethren (Hutterische Brüder)|Hutterite]] family name. In 1760 Abraham Tschetter at [[Sobotište (Trnavský kraj, Slovakia)|Sobotište]], [[Hungary|Hungary]], vigorously opposed a [[Jesuits (1957)|Jesuit]] who had been sent by the government to catholicize the Hutterian Brethren and who was preaching in their meetinghouse. Tschetter was soon arrested and taken to Erlau, about 50 miles from the [[Bruderhof|Bruderhof]], and imprisoned in the Jesuit monastery prison. Here he gave up his faith and became [[Roman Catholic Church|Catholic]]. Lorenz Tschetter was imprisoned in 1766 at Alwinc, Hungary, for his faith. Upon his release in 1767 he went to [[Walachia (Romania)|Walachia]] with the rest of the Bruderhof, and from there to [[Russia|Russia]], where the family increased. [[Tschetter, Paul (1842-1919)|Paul]] and Lorentz Tschetter were among the twelve delegates from several Mennonite branches in Russia who came to the [[United States of America|United States]] and [[Canada|Canada]] in 1873 to look for land and in 1874 led some 40 families to Dakota. Paul Tschetter became a leader of the group that joined the [[Krimmer Mennonite Brethren|Krimmer Mennonite Brethren]] (KMB) Church. His son J. W. Tschetter was long a KMB city missionary in Chicago.
  
 
In 1957 five Tschetters were serving as head preachers in Hutterite Bruderhofs of the [[Dariusleut|Dariusleut]], viz., Paul J. Tschetter of the Thompson Bruderhof, Christian Tschetter of the Husher (Rosebud) Bruderhof, Jacob Tschetter of the [[Tschetter Hutterite Colony (Irricana, Alberta, Canada)|Howl Ranch (Tschetter) Bruderhof]], Lorentz R. Tschetter of the Riverside Bruderhof, and Peter S. Tschetter of the [[Holt Hutterite Colony (Yarrow, Alberta, Canada)|Holt Bruderhof]]. There were also four Tschetter ministers in the [[General Conference Mennonite Church (GCM)|General Conference Mennonite]] group, among them P. P. Tschetter of Kingman, Kansas.
 
In 1957 five Tschetters were serving as head preachers in Hutterite Bruderhofs of the [[Dariusleut|Dariusleut]], viz., Paul J. Tschetter of the Thompson Bruderhof, Christian Tschetter of the Husher (Rosebud) Bruderhof, Jacob Tschetter of the [[Tschetter Hutterite Colony (Irricana, Alberta, Canada)|Howl Ranch (Tschetter) Bruderhof]], Lorentz R. Tschetter of the Riverside Bruderhof, and Peter S. Tschetter of the [[Holt Hutterite Colony (Yarrow, Alberta, Canada)|Holt Bruderhof]]. There were also four Tschetter ministers in the [[General Conference Mennonite Church (GCM)|General Conference Mennonite]] group, among them P. P. Tschetter of Kingman, Kansas.
 
 
 
= Bibliography =
 
= Bibliography =
"The Diary of Paul Tschetter." <em>Mennonite Quarterly Review</em> 5 (1931): 112-27 and 198-220.
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"The Diary of Paul Tschetter." <em>Mennonite Quarterly Review</em> 5 (1931): 112-27 and 198-220.
  
 
Smith, C. Henry. <em>The Coming of the Russian Mennonites</em>. Berne, 1927: 52, 59, 64, 66, 72-74, 103.
 
Smith, C. Henry. <em>The Coming of the Russian Mennonites</em>. Berne, 1927: 52, 59, 64, 66, 72-74, 103.
  
 
Zieglschmid, A. J. F. <em>Das Klein-Geschichtsbuch der Hutterischen Brüder</em>. Philadelphia, PA: Carl Schurz Memorial Foundation, 1947: 234, 254-256.
 
Zieglschmid, A. J. F. <em>Das Klein-Geschichtsbuch der Hutterischen Brüder</em>. Philadelphia, PA: Carl Schurz Memorial Foundation, 1947: 234, 254-256.
 
 
 
{{GAMEO_footer|hp=Vol. 4, p. 752|date=1959|a1_last=Decker|a1_first=David|a2_last= |a2_first= }}
 
{{GAMEO_footer|hp=Vol. 4, p. 752|date=1959|a1_last=Decker|a1_first=David|a2_last= |a2_first= }}

Revision as of 19:02, 20 August 2013

Tschetter (Czeterle), a Hutterite family name. In 1760 Abraham Tschetter at Sobotište, Hungary, vigorously opposed a Jesuit who had been sent by the government to catholicize the Hutterian Brethren and who was preaching in their meetinghouse. Tschetter was soon arrested and taken to Erlau, about 50 miles from the Bruderhof, and imprisoned in the Jesuit monastery prison. Here he gave up his faith and became Catholic. Lorenz Tschetter was imprisoned in 1766 at Alwinc, Hungary, for his faith. Upon his release in 1767 he went to Walachia with the rest of the Bruderhof, and from there to Russia, where the family increased. Paul and Lorentz Tschetter were among the twelve delegates from several Mennonite branches in Russia who came to the United States and Canada in 1873 to look for land and in 1874 led some 40 families to Dakota. Paul Tschetter became a leader of the group that joined the Krimmer Mennonite Brethren (KMB) Church. His son J. W. Tschetter was long a KMB city missionary in Chicago.

In 1957 five Tschetters were serving as head preachers in Hutterite Bruderhofs of the Dariusleut, viz., Paul J. Tschetter of the Thompson Bruderhof, Christian Tschetter of the Husher (Rosebud) Bruderhof, Jacob Tschetter of the Howl Ranch (Tschetter) Bruderhof, Lorentz R. Tschetter of the Riverside Bruderhof, and Peter S. Tschetter of the Holt Bruderhof. There were also four Tschetter ministers in the General Conference Mennonite group, among them P. P. Tschetter of Kingman, Kansas.

Bibliography

"The Diary of Paul Tschetter." Mennonite Quarterly Review 5 (1931): 112-27 and 198-220.

Smith, C. Henry. The Coming of the Russian Mennonites. Berne, 1927: 52, 59, 64, 66, 72-74, 103.

Zieglschmid, A. J. F. Das Klein-Geschichtsbuch der Hutterischen Brüder. Philadelphia, PA: Carl Schurz Memorial Foundation, 1947: 234, 254-256.


Author(s) David Decker
Date Published 1959


Cite This Article

MLA style

Decker, David. "Tschetter family name." Global Anabaptist Mennonite Encyclopedia Online. 1959. Web. 23 Jul 2014. http://gameo.org/index.php?title=Tschetter_family_name&oldid=78319.

APA style

Decker, David. (1959). Tschetter family name. Global Anabaptist Mennonite Encyclopedia Online. Retrieved 23 July 2014, from http://gameo.org/index.php?title=Tschetter_family_name&oldid=78319.




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Adapted by permission of Herald Press, Harrisonburg, Virginia, and Waterloo, Ontario, from Mennonite Encyclopedia, Vol. 4, p. 752. All rights reserved. For information on ordering the encyclopedia visit the Herald Press website.


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