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Pyotr A. Stolypin (1862-1911)
Source: Wikipedia Commons

Pyotr (Peter) Arkadyevich Stolypin became prime min­ister of Russia in 1906 and suppressed the revolu­tion at that time. He introduced agricultural laws to enable landless peasants and small farmers to ac­quire crown land. The Mennonites also benefited by this law when they obtained land in the Kulundian Steppes and established the Slavgorod settlement in Siberia. On 10 September 1910, Stoly­pin visited the Slavgorod Mennonite settlement, on which occasion he was received by the Oberschulze Jacob A. Reimer and the minister Peter J. Wiebe. Possibly in part as a result of this meeting a post office and a hospital were erected in Orloff and a branch line of the Trans-Siberian Railroad built from Tatarskaya to Slavgorod. In memory of its benefactor, the Slavgorod Mennonites erected a memorial to Peter A. Stolypin in Orloff in 1912. Stolypin was killed by a revolutionary in Kiev in 18 September 1911.

Bibliography

Der Bote (13 August 1952): 5.

Fast, Gerhard. In den Steppen Sibiriens. Rosthern, 1957: 29 ff.


Author(s) Cornelius Krahn
Date Published 1959


Cite This Article

MLA style

Krahn, Cornelius. "Stolypin, Pyotr A. (1862-1911)." Global Anabaptist Mennonite Encyclopedia Online. 1959. Web. 27 Aug 2014. http://gameo.org/index.php?title=Stolypin,_Pyotr_A._(1862-1911)&oldid=121311.

APA style

Krahn, Cornelius. (1959). Stolypin, Pyotr A. (1862-1911). Global Anabaptist Mennonite Encyclopedia Online. Retrieved 27 August 2014, from http://gameo.org/index.php?title=Stolypin,_Pyotr_A._(1862-1911)&oldid=121311.




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Adapted by permission of Herald Press, Harrisonburg, Virginia, and Waterloo, Ontario, from Mennonite Encyclopedia, Vol. 4, p. 636. All rights reserved. For information on ordering the encyclopedia visit the Herald Press website.


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