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[http://www.bcmb.org British Columbia Conference of the Mennonite Brethren Churches] (1963-1987)
 
[http://www.bcmb.org British Columbia Conference of the Mennonite Brethren Churches] (1963-1987)
  
[http://www.mbconf.ca Canadian Conference of Mennonite Brethren Churches] (1963-1987)
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[http://www.mennonitebrethren.ca/ Canadian Conference of Mennonite Brethren Churches] (1963-1987)
  
 
General Conference of Mennonite Brethren Churches
 
General Conference of Mennonite Brethren Churches

Revision as of 18:17, 2 March 2014

Contents

In 1943, Hilda Neufeld wrote a letter to Abe Stobbe of South Abbotsford Mennonite Brethren Church, who was working with the West Coast Children's Mission at the time, and inquired about initiating religious education in the Langley area. As a result, he asked the Langley School District if he could use South Otter Elementary School for conducting Sunday school classes. With help from South Abbotsford, Elmer Warkentin and his sister, Leslie Buehler, organized a time of teaching for the local children, but vandalism to the school forced them to re-locate to the home of Cesar Anderlini. Eventually, prayer meetings were conducted there as well, led by congregational members from South Abbotsford and McCallum Road (Central Heights) Mennonite Brethren churches.

In 1949, regular worship services were held in the Anderlini home, led by Abe Stobbe. At this time, the congregation was known as Otter Road Chapel. Soon, a mission hall was constructed in 1951 on land donated by Mr. Anderlini just south of his own home; George Konrad and John H. Enns led the worship services at this time. In February 1959, Mr. Anderlini donated additional property in order to accommodate an expansion to the existing facilities. Also at this time the congregation called its first pastor, Jake Neufeld. In March 1960, the old chapel was renovated for use as a parsonage.

The congregation applied for and was accepted into the British Columbia Conference of Mennonite Brethren Churches in 1963. In 1971, the church building was expanded by sixteen feet, but soon it was necessary to construct and attach a new sanctuary to the existing structure. The new addition was dedicated on 4 March 1980. Internal difficulties arose within the congregation in 1987 resulting in a decrease in membership from 50 to 16 people. South Otter dissolved in November 1987 and was replaced a year later by Hillside Community Church.

The church was located at 2013- 248th St., R.R.4, Aldergrove, BC, V0X 1A0.

Bibliography

Mennonite Observer (8 April 1960): 1.

Additional Information

Denominational Affiliation:

British Columbia Conference of the Mennonite Brethren Churches (1963-1987)

Canadian Conference of Mennonite Brethren Churches (1963-1987)

General Conference of Mennonite Brethren Churches

South Otter MB Church Leading Ministers

Minister Years
Jacob "Jay" Neufeld 1959-1962
Victor Stobbe 1963-1967
Calvin Buehler 1967-1971
Herman Voth 1971-1975
David Esau 1975-1982
Carl Bracewell 1982-1986

South Otter MB Church Membership

Year Members
1965 32
1975 51
1981 71
1985 75
1987 50


Author(s) Andrew Klager
Date Published August 2007


Cite This Article

MLA style

Klager, Andrew. "South Otter Mennonite Brethren Church (Aldergrove, British Columbia, Canada)." Global Anabaptist Mennonite Encyclopedia Online. August 2007. Web. 26 Jul 2014. http://gameo.org/index.php?title=South_Otter_Mennonite_Brethren_Church_(Aldergrove,_British_Columbia,_Canada)&oldid=114649.

APA style

Klager, Andrew. (August 2007). South Otter Mennonite Brethren Church (Aldergrove, British Columbia, Canada). Global Anabaptist Mennonite Encyclopedia Online. Retrieved 26 July 2014, from http://gameo.org/index.php?title=South_Otter_Mennonite_Brethren_Church_(Aldergrove,_British_Columbia,_Canada)&oldid=114649.




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