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Souterliedekens, a Dutch medieval term for Psalms, were much used in the 16th-century Reformation period. "The Souterliedekens, though intended for the use of the [[Roman Catholic Church|Catholics]], form the transition to the congregational singing of the Reformed" (Wolkan). A well-known edition was the one published at [[Antwerp (Belgium)|Antwerp, Belgium]], in 1540 under the title <em>Souterliedekens, Ghemaeckt ter eeren Gods op alle die Psalmen van David: tot stichtinghe ende een gheestelijcke vermakjnghe van allen Christen menschen.</em> This edition was reprinted more than 30 times under a variety of titles, the last reprint having been published in 1652 by Karel de Fleger (Vlieger), a Mennonite printer at Hamburg, [[Germany|Germany]].
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Souterliedekens, a Dutch medieval term for Psalms, were much used in the 16th-century Reformation period. "The Souterliedekens, though intended for the use of the [[Roman Catholic Church|Catholics]], form the transition to the congregational singing of the Reformed" (Wolkan). A well-known edition was the one published at [[Antwerp (Belgium)|Antwerp, Belgium]], in 1540 under the title <em>Souterliedekens, Ghemaeckt ter eeren Gods op alle die Psalmen van David: tot stichtinghe ende een gheestelijcke vermakinghe van allen Christen menschen.</em> This edition was reprinted more than 30 times under a variety of titles, the last reprint having been published in 1652 by Karel de Fleger (Vlieger), a Mennonite printer at Hamburg, [[Germany|Germany]].
  
 
Though the early Dutch [[Anabaptism|Anabaptists]] knew the "souterliedekens" and some martyrs are said to have sung a "souterlieken," these Psalms were apparently not popular among the Anabaptists: the reason may have been that the "souterliedekens" had come from Catholicism, with which they wished to make a complete break. They preferred to sing the "liedekens" (songs) written by or in honor of the martyrs, and it was not before the publication of the [[Lietboeck, inhoudende Schriftuerlijcke Vermaen Liederen|<em>Lietboeck</em>]] of Hans de Ries in 1582, which contained some Psalms, that singing of Psalms was introduced in at least a number of Mennonite congregations. (See also [[Psalms as Hymns|Psalms]] and [[Hymnology of the Swiss, French, and South German Mennonites|Hymnology]].)
 
Though the early Dutch [[Anabaptism|Anabaptists]] knew the "souterliedekens" and some martyrs are said to have sung a "souterlieken," these Psalms were apparently not popular among the Anabaptists: the reason may have been that the "souterliedekens" had come from Catholicism, with which they wished to make a complete break. They preferred to sing the "liedekens" (songs) written by or in honor of the martyrs, and it was not before the publication of the [[Lietboeck, inhoudende Schriftuerlijcke Vermaen Liederen|<em>Lietboeck</em>]] of Hans de Ries in 1582, which contained some Psalms, that singing of Psalms was introduced in at least a number of Mennonite congregations. (See also [[Psalms as Hymns|Psalms]] and [[Hymnology of the Swiss, French, and South German Mennonites|Hymnology]].)

Revision as of 21:36, 2 December 2013

Souterliedekens, a Dutch medieval term for Psalms, were much used in the 16th-century Reformation period. "The Souterliedekens, though intended for the use of the Catholics, form the transition to the congregational singing of the Reformed" (Wolkan). A well-known edition was the one published at Antwerp, Belgium, in 1540 under the title Souterliedekens, Ghemaeckt ter eeren Gods op alle die Psalmen van David: tot stichtinghe ende een gheestelijcke vermakinghe van allen Christen menschen. This edition was reprinted more than 30 times under a variety of titles, the last reprint having been published in 1652 by Karel de Fleger (Vlieger), a Mennonite printer at Hamburg, Germany.

Though the early Dutch Anabaptists knew the "souterliedekens" and some martyrs are said to have sung a "souterlieken," these Psalms were apparently not popular among the Anabaptists: the reason may have been that the "souterliedekens" had come from Catholicism, with which they wished to make a complete break. They preferred to sing the "liedekens" (songs) written by or in honor of the martyrs, and it was not before the publication of the Lietboeck of Hans de Ries in 1582, which contained some Psalms, that singing of Psalms was introduced in at least a number of Mennonite congregations. (See also Psalms and Hymnology.)

Bibliography

Wieder, F. C. Schriftuurlijke Liedekens. The Hague, 1900: 129 et passim.

Wolkan, Rudolf. Die Lieder der Wiedertäufer. Berlin, 1903. Reprinted Nieuwkoop: B. De Graaf, 1965: 58.


Author(s) Nanne van der Zijpp
Date Published 1959


Cite This Article

MLA style

van der Zijpp, Nanne. "Souterliedekens." Global Anabaptist Mennonite Encyclopedia Online. 1959. Web. 22 Jul 2014. http://gameo.org/index.php?title=Souterliedekens&oldid=104584.

APA style

van der Zijpp, Nanne. (1959). Souterliedekens. Global Anabaptist Mennonite Encyclopedia Online. Retrieved 22 July 2014, from http://gameo.org/index.php?title=Souterliedekens&oldid=104584.




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Adapted by permission of Herald Press, Harrisonburg, Virginia, and Waterloo, Ontario, from Mennonite Encyclopedia, Vol. 4, p. 582. All rights reserved. For information on ordering the encyclopedia visit the Herald Press website.


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