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Slavgorod Mennonite Orphanage was organized in 1919 when Peter Löwen of Halbstadt in Slavgorod Mennonite settlement of Siberia, placed his newly established home at the disposal of the settlement for the purpose of caring for the orphans of the community. The dedication took place in September 1919. Some 50 orphans had been accepted. Mr. and Mrs. Nikolai Friesen of Gnadenheim were the house parents, assisted by a Vollrat, of Germany. Jacob Derksen of Schöntal was the teacher. The Mennonite community was responsible for the support of the institution. Help for the workers was received from private sources and through the Mennonites of America. Of the two freight car loads of clothing which came from North America to Slavgorod, the orphanage received a considerable share. Soon the Communist Party caused difficulties. Under pressure of the Soviet government the orphanage dissolved and the children were distributed in families.

[edit] Bibliography

Fast, Gerhard. In den Stephen Sibiriens. Rosthern, 1957: 80.


Author(s) Cornelius Krahn
Date Published 1959


[edit] Cite This Article

MLA style

Krahn, Cornelius. "Slavgorod Mennonite Orphanage (Halbstadt, Slavgorod Mennonite Settlement, Siberia, Russia)." Global Anabaptist Mennonite Encyclopedia Online. 1959. Web. 10 Jul 2014. http://gameo.org/index.php?title=Slavgorod_Mennonite_Orphanage_(Halbstadt,_Slavgorod_Mennonite_Settlement,_Siberia,_Russia)&oldid=85025.

APA style

Krahn, Cornelius. (1959). Slavgorod Mennonite Orphanage (Halbstadt, Slavgorod Mennonite Settlement, Siberia, Russia). Global Anabaptist Mennonite Encyclopedia Online. Retrieved 10 July 2014, from http://gameo.org/index.php?title=Slavgorod_Mennonite_Orphanage_(Halbstadt,_Slavgorod_Mennonite_Settlement,_Siberia,_Russia)&oldid=85025.




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Adapted by permission of Herald Press, Harrisonburg, Virginia, and Waterloo, Ontario, from Mennonite Encyclopedia, Vol. 4, p. 540. All rights reserved. For information on ordering the encyclopedia visit the Herald Press website.


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