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Nikolai Siemens, a leader of the Mennonites in the Fernheim Colony, Paraguay, was born 15 March 1895 in Johannesfeld in the Crimea, South Russia, died 24 September 1958 in Fernheim. In 1910 his family moved to Smolyanovka, Omsk district, Siberia, where he was baptized at 15 in the Mennonite Brethren (MB) Church and early chosen as preacher. In 1923-25 he attended the Bible School at Tchongrav, Crimea, and the following year the Orenburg Bible School, after which he returned to Smolyanovka to become leader of the MB congregation there. In 1929 he emigrated to Paraguay and settled in Fernheim in 1930. Here he became editor of the Menno-Blatt, which he edited and published for 25 years. He served for varying periods on the “Kommission für kirchliche Angelegenheiten,” on the Missions Committee, and as director and teacher of the traveling Bible school, the forerunner of the Fernheim Bible School. He was the guide and teacher of many young ministers, was active in youth work, was a warm advocate in inter-Mennonite co-operation, and a loyal and firm supporter of Fernheim Colony.


Bibliography

Menno-Blatt (16 October 1958).



Author(s) Harold S Bender
Date Published 1959


Cite This Article

MLA style

Bender, Harold S. "Siemens, Nikolai (1895-1958)." Global Anabaptist Mennonite Encyclopedia Online. 1959. Web. 26 Jul 2014. http://gameo.org/index.php?title=Siemens,_Nikolai_(1895-1958)&oldid=68099.

APA style

Bender, Harold S. (1959). Siemens, Nikolai (1895-1958). Global Anabaptist Mennonite Encyclopedia Online. Retrieved 26 July 2014, from http://gameo.org/index.php?title=Siemens,_Nikolai_(1895-1958)&oldid=68099.




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Adapted by permission of Herald Press, Harrisonburg, Virginia, and Waterloo, Ontario, from Mennonite Encyclopedia, Vol. 4, p. 524. All rights reserved. For information on ordering the encyclopedia visit the Herald Press website.


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