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Settlement Mennonite Church now extinct, was organized by Mennonite families in Northampton County, Pennsylvania, in 1802, when a meetinghouse was built, evidently as the continuation of the older Siegfried congregation, the first meetinghouse of which was built on what is now Twenty-first Street, Northampton, Pennsylvania, in 1760 or earlier. The trustees in 1802 were Jacob Baer, Jacob Histand, John Ziegler, and Samuel Landis. As was usual in Pennsylvania prior to the adoption of the Public School Law of 1834 the land was given for both church and school purposes. The Mennonites built on this lot a frame building, 26 x 30 feet in size. But the effort to revive the congregation did not succeed. For the next hundred years there was a weary struggle for survival. Franconia Mennonite Conference preachers, General Conference Mennonites, and even independents, all made efforts to keep the congregation alive, but in vain. Finally in 1908 the property was sold and converted into a dwelling. The Cement National Bank of Siegfried, Northampton, Pennsylvania, is custodian of a trust fund for the care of the cemetery, which has about 60 marked graves.

Bibliography

Wenger, J. C. History of the Mennonites of the Franconia Conference. Telford, 1937: 229-31.


Author(s) John C Wenger
Date Published 1959


Cite This Article

MLA style

Wenger, John C. "Settlement Mennonite Church (Northampton, Pennsylvania, USA)." Global Anabaptist Mennonite Encyclopedia Online. 1959. Web. 22 Oct 2014. http://gameo.org/index.php?title=Settlement_Mennonite_Church_(Northampton,_Pennsylvania,_USA)&oldid=96383.

APA style

Wenger, John C. (1959). Settlement Mennonite Church (Northampton, Pennsylvania, USA). Global Anabaptist Mennonite Encyclopedia Online. Retrieved 22 October 2014, from http://gameo.org/index.php?title=Settlement_Mennonite_Church_(Northampton,_Pennsylvania,_USA)&oldid=96383.




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Adapted by permission of Herald Press, Harrisonburg, Virginia, and Waterloo, Ontario, from Mennonite Encyclopedia, Vol. 4, p. 507. All rights reserved. For information on ordering the encyclopedia visit the Herald Press website.


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