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Hans Sedlmaier, a peasant of Oberhaim in the Landshut area of Bavaria, Germany, was won for the Anabaptist movement by Augustin Würtzlburger and was baptized with his wife and two sons, Paul and Wilbold, and his daughter Katerina. Soon afterward, in 1528, he was arrested and taken to Landshut, where he was tried on the rack. Sedlmaier confessed that Würtzlburger had been with him twice in Oberhaim, and had baptized him; he did not consider this a second baptism, since his baptism as an infant was not a true baptism. He had partaken of the sacrament at Easter, but only as the bread of thanksgiving. But he refused to confess that Würtzlburger had been rebaptized "even if they would tear him to pieces." He ended his confession by saying that he would die for his faith. He was presumably beheaded, for not long afterward the Landshut council reported to Augsburg that an Anabaptist had been thus executed.

[edit] Bibliography

Hege, Christian and Christian Neff. Mennonitisches Lexikon. Frankfurt & Weierhof: Hege; Karlsruhe; Schneider, 1913-1967: v. IV.

Schornbaum, Karl. Quellen zur Geschichte der Täufer, V. Band (Bayern, II. Abteilung). Gütersloh: C. Bertelsmann, 1951: 21 ff.

Winter, V. A. Geschichte der baierischen Wiedertaufer. Munich, 1809: 26 ff.


Author(s) Christian Neff
Date Published 1959


[edit] Cite This Article

MLA style

Neff, Christian. "Sedlmaier, Hans (d. 1528)." Global Anabaptist Mennonite Encyclopedia Online. 1959. Web. 22 Jul 2014. http://gameo.org/index.php?title=Sedlmaier,_Hans_(d._1528)&oldid=77706.

APA style

Neff, Christian. (1959). Sedlmaier, Hans (d. 1528). Global Anabaptist Mennonite Encyclopedia Online. Retrieved 22 July 2014, from http://gameo.org/index.php?title=Sedlmaier,_Hans_(d._1528)&oldid=77706.




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Adapted by permission of Herald Press, Harrisonburg, Virginia, and Waterloo, Ontario, from Mennonite Encyclopedia, Vol. 4, pp. 494-495. All rights reserved. For information on ordering the encyclopedia visit the Herald Press website.


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