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David Isaak Schroeder: pioneer and estate owner; born 20 September 1776 in Klein Lubin, Schwetz,  West Prussia to Isaak Schroeder (1738-1789) and Maria (Siebrant) Schroeder (1742-1778). He was the twelfth of 16 children in the family, the second youngest child of his father’s second wife. In March 1807, he married Aganetha Kliewer (2 August 1785, Treul bei Neuenburg, Schwetz, Prussia - 22 July 1840, Tashchenak, Taurida, South Russia), daughter of Heinrich and Katarina (Harms) Kliewer. The couple had nine children, one of whom died as a child. David was a wealthy businessman who bought land at Neu-Tashchenak and established the Neuteich estate. He died on 23 July 1834, likely on the estate.

For the first years of his life, David lived with his family in Prussia. In about 1804, he immigrated to the Molotschna Mennonite Settlement in South Russia, together with his future wife’s family. David married Aganetha Kliewer in March 1807 in South Russia. From the Molotschna, David moved to the city of Ekaterinoslav, where he established a woodworking business, possibly financed in part by his father-in-law.

Schroeder soon sold his business and moved south to Neu-Tashchenak, where he bought some land and established an estate called Neuteich, near the estate of Schönteich, which had been established by Wilhelm Martens. He continued to run the estate for the rest of his life, after which his son David took over its management.

David and Aganetha Schroeder’s eldest son, David, also built up several of his own estates, using his and his wife’s inheritance. He and his brother Peter also bought land in the Umenzov area, and several of their other siblings were also involved in estate ownership.

David Isaak Schroeder was one of the first estate owners among the Mennonites in Russia. Through his hard work, he helped begin a tradition of land ownership that would continue for over a century.

Bibliography

Der Bote (22 September 1954): 4; (20 October 1954): 4.

Dueck, Abe. "Peter Martinovitch Friesen (1849-1914)." In Shepherds, Servants and Prophets, edited by Harry Loewen. Kitchener, ON: Pandora Press, 2003: 136.

Friesen, P. M. Die Alt-Evangelische Mennonitische Brüderschaft in Russland, 1789-1910. Halbstadt, Taurida: Raduga, 1911; many pages throughout for the biographies of Peter Heinrich Heese, Heinrich Heinrich Reimer and Jakob Jakob Sudermann.

GRANDMA (The Genealogical Registry and Database of Mennonite Ancestry) Database, 5.07 ed. Fresno, CA: California Mennonite Historical Society, 2009: #207710.

Huebert, Helmut T. Mennonite Estates in Imperial Russia. Winnipeg, MB: Springfield Publishers, 2005: 308-311.

Jahresbericht . . . in Sachen der Unterhaltung der Forstkommandos in Jahre 1908. 1908 Forstei list: 14.

Klassen, Paul. From the Steppes to the Prairies. Winnipeg, MB: Self-published, 1997: 282, 283.

Neufeld, Herman. "Aus schwerer Zeit." In Christlicher Familien-Kalendar (1919): 104-113.

Peters, Katie and Abraham J. Braun. Genealogy of Isaak Schroeder, 1738-1973. Winnipeg, MB, 1973: 128, 147, 150, 159, 161, 237.

Regehr, T., with the assistance of J. I. Regehr. For Everything a Season: A History of the Alexanderkrone Zentralschule. Winnipeg, MB: CMBC Publications, 1988: 8, 19, 61, 62, 68, 129.

Rempel, Peter. List of Estates in the Province of Ekaterinoslav, p. 104.

Sudermann, David P., personal family information.

Wiens, Gerhard, report.


Author(s) Susan Huebert
Helmut T. Huebert
Date Published 2012


Cite This Article

MLA style

Huebert, Susan and Helmut T. Huebert. "Schroeder, David Isaak (1776-1834)." Global Anabaptist Mennonite Encyclopedia Online. 2012. Web. 12 Jul 2014. http://gameo.org/index.php?title=Schroeder,_David_Isaak_(1776-1834)&oldid=96363.

APA style

Huebert, Susan and Helmut T. Huebert. (2012). Schroeder, David Isaak (1776-1834). Global Anabaptist Mennonite Encyclopedia Online. Retrieved 12 July 2014, from http://gameo.org/index.php?title=Schroeder,_David_Isaak_(1776-1834)&oldid=96363.




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