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Former Salem Fellowship building in 2011. 

The Salem Mennonite congregation at Atwood, Ontario resulted from a division from Fairhaven and Cedar Grove Amish Mennonite congregations over issues of doctrine and greater use of the English language. The Salem congregation used English exclusively, but retained the traditional Beachy Amish practice of unpaid ministers. Originally the group affiliated with the Beachy Amish Mennonite Fellowship, but later became affiliated with the Midwest Mennonite Fellowship. The congregation established its own outreach near Athens, Ontario (Canaan Christian Fellowship) in 1982.

The congregation's membership in 1975 was 22, in 1985, 36. The congregation obtained a building in 1969. The congregation closed 13 March 2000; the church building was subsequently sold to the Mount Zion Mennonite Church. Some of the members transferred to the Zion Mennonite Fellowship.

The church was located eight km northwest of Milverton on the 12th line of Elma Township. Bishop for the congregation in 1986 was Lorne J. Steckley, who helped found the congregation in 1967. He remained the bishop at the time the congregational closed.

[edit] Bibliography

Yoder, Elmer S. The Beachy Amish Mennonite Fellowship Churches. Hartville, OH: Diakonia Ministries, 1987: 369.

Glenn Zehr to Sam Steiner, 23 November 2002.


Author(s) Marlene Epp
Sam Steiner
Date Published 2002


[edit] Cite This Article

MLA style

Epp, Marlene and Sam Steiner. "Salem Mennonite Fellowship (Atwood, Ontario, Canada)." Global Anabaptist Mennonite Encyclopedia Online. 2002. Web. 1 Sep 2014. http://gameo.org/index.php?title=Salem_Mennonite_Fellowship_(Atwood,_Ontario,_Canada)&oldid=115708.

APA style

Epp, Marlene and Sam Steiner. (2002). Salem Mennonite Fellowship (Atwood, Ontario, Canada). Global Anabaptist Mennonite Encyclopedia Online. Retrieved 1 September 2014, from http://gameo.org/index.php?title=Salem_Mennonite_Fellowship_(Atwood,_Ontario,_Canada)&oldid=115708.




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