From GAMEO
Jump to: navigation, search

Salem Evangelical Mennonite Church, near Gridley, Illinois, formerly known as the Defenseless Mennonite Church, had its origin in a schism in the Waldo Amish Mennonite (Mennonite Church) congregation during the Civil War, after 1863, due to the new insights of the minister into Christian experience with emphasis upon conversion, and the influence of Henry Egly of Indiana, the founder of the Evangelical (Defenseless) Mennonites. The first meetinghouse was erected in 1875, and the second, which has been remodeled twice, in 1893. Joseph Rediger, who was ordained to the ministry in the Amish Mennonite church in 1863, was the first minister. Other ministers who have served the church are John Rediger, Christian King, C. R. Egle, Christian Rediger, Eli J. Oyer, Benjamin E. Rediger, Benjamin Rupp, H. E. Bertsche, I. R. Calhoun, Edward Enns, and C. L. Zimmerman. Several ministers and missionaries have come from this congregation. The membership in 1957 was 196. The congregation is now called the Gridley Mennonite Church.

[edit] Bibliography

Weber, H. F. Centennial History of the Mennonites of Illinois. Goshen, 1931: 342-56.


Author(s) E. E Zimmerman
Date Published 1959


[edit] Cite This Article

MLA style

Zimmerman, E. E. "Salem Evangelical Mennonite Church (Gridley, Illinois, USA)." Global Anabaptist Mennonite Encyclopedia Online. 1959. Web. 21 Apr 2014. http://gameo.org/index.php?title=Salem_Evangelical_Mennonite_Church_(Gridley,_Illinois,_USA)&oldid=77336.

APA style

Zimmerman, E. E. (1959). Salem Evangelical Mennonite Church (Gridley, Illinois, USA). Global Anabaptist Mennonite Encyclopedia Online. Retrieved 21 April 2014, from http://gameo.org/index.php?title=Salem_Evangelical_Mennonite_Church_(Gridley,_Illinois,_USA)&oldid=77336.




Hpbuttns.gif
Adapted by permission of Herald Press, Harrisonburg, Virginia, and Waterloo, Ontario, from Mennonite Encyclopedia, Vol. 4, pp. 403-404. All rights reserved. For information on ordering the encyclopedia visit the Herald Press website.


©1996-2014 by the Global Anabaptist Mennonite Encyclopedia Online. All rights reserved.