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Russian Missions of the [[Mennonite Brethren Church|Mennonite Brethren (MB) Church]] had their beginning soon after the establishment of the MB Church. Early preachers to the Russians were [[Wieler, Johann (1839-1889)|Johann Wieler]] 1883-89, Jacob F. Froese, Adolf Penner 1906-? and Hermann Fast 1892-? Fast was for some time active in St. Petersburg and in Rumania, and after 1901 among the Russians in [[Canada|Canada]]. The MB Church of [[Russia|Russia]] established a special fund in 1905 which supported eight Russian evangelists. Some of the Brethren were given prison sentences for disregarding the law against proselyting among the Greek Orthodox; among these were Froese and [[Unruh, Abraham H. (1878-1961)|A. H. Unruh]]. After the [[Russian Revolution and Civil War|revolution]] of 1917 work was taken up more freely by tent evangelism (Jacob J. Dyck, 1919), in which a number of Mennonite Brethren were engaged. With few exceptions they were later murdered by the [[Makhno, Nestor (1888-1934)|Makhno]] bandits.
 
Russian Missions of the [[Mennonite Brethren Church|Mennonite Brethren (MB) Church]] had their beginning soon after the establishment of the MB Church. Early preachers to the Russians were [[Wieler, Johann (1839-1889)|Johann Wieler]] 1883-89, Jacob F. Froese, Adolf Penner 1906-? and Hermann Fast 1892-? Fast was for some time active in St. Petersburg and in Rumania, and after 1901 among the Russians in [[Canada|Canada]]. The MB Church of [[Russia|Russia]] established a special fund in 1905 which supported eight Russian evangelists. Some of the Brethren were given prison sentences for disregarding the law against proselyting among the Greek Orthodox; among these were Froese and [[Unruh, Abraham H. (1878-1961)|A. H. Unruh]]. After the [[Russian Revolution and Civil War|revolution]] of 1917 work was taken up more freely by tent evangelism (Jacob J. Dyck, 1919), in which a number of Mennonite Brethren were engaged. With few exceptions they were later murdered by the [[Makhno, Nestor (1888-1934)|Makhno]] bandits.
  
After the establishment of the MB Church in [[North America|America]] following the immigration of 1870 and following, MB preachers repeatedly conducted Gospel meetings in the Russian settlements in [[North Dakota (USA)|North Dakota]] and [[Saskatchewan (Canada)|Saskatchewan]], Hermann Fast and John F. Harms serving as evangelists and pastors to the converts. In 1905 the conference published a small Christian periodical, <em>Golos</em> (that is, Voice), with Fast as editor. Congregations were organized at Kief and Dogden, North Dakota, and at Arlee and Blaine Lake, Saskatchewan, which were to some extent affiliated with the MB Conference, but which also held their own conferences. Luke Kravchenko was one of their outstanding ministers. The [[Board of Foreign Missions (Mennonite Brethren Church of North America)|Board of Foreign Missions]] of the MB Church has for a number of years supported workers among the Russians of Canada. In 1949 the [[Canadian Conference of Mennonite Brethren Churches|Canadian Conference]] was supporting Peter Schroeder at [[Gospel Chapel Fellowship (Grand Forks, British Columbia, Canada)|Grand Forks, British Columbia]], who worked among the [[Dukhobors|Dukhobors]], [[Wiens, David B. (1908-1981)|D. B. Wiens]]at Arlee, Saskatchewan, and A. Huebert, an itinerant preacher. (See [[Evangelism|Evangelism]].)
+
After the establishment of the MB Church in [[North America|America]] following the immigration of 1870 and following, MB preachers repeatedly conducted Gospel meetings in the Russian settlements in [[North Dakota (USA)|North Dakota]] and [[Saskatchewan (Canada)|Saskatchewan]], Hermann Fast and John F. Harms serving as evangelists and pastors to the converts. In 1905 the conference published a small Christian periodical, <em>Golos</em> (that is, Voice), with Fast as editor. Congregations were organized at Kief and Dogden, North Dakota, and at Arlee and Blaine Lake, Saskatchewan, which were to some extent affiliated with the MB Conference, but which also held their own conferences. Luke Kravchenko was one of their outstanding ministers. The [[Board of Foreign Missions (Mennonite Brethren Church of North America)|Board of Foreign Missions]] of the MB Church has for a number of years supported workers among the Russians of Canada. In 1949 the [[Canadian Conference of Mennonite Brethren Churches|Canadian Conference]] was supporting Peter Schroeder at [[Gospel Chapel Fellowship (Grand Forks, British Columbia, Canada)|Grand Forks, British Columbia]], who worked among the [[Dukhobors|Dukhobors]], [[Wiens, David B. (1908-1981)|D. B. Wiens ]]at Arlee, Saskatchewan, and A. Huebert, an itinerant preacher. (See [[Evangelism|Evangelism]].)
 
= Bibliography =
 
= Bibliography =
 
Lohrenz, John H. <em>The Mennonite Brethren Church</em>. Hillsboro, 1950.
 
Lohrenz, John H. <em>The Mennonite Brethren Church</em>. Hillsboro, 1950.

Latest revision as of 14:49, 23 August 2013

Russian Missions of the Mennonite Brethren (MB) Church had their beginning soon after the establishment of the MB Church. Early preachers to the Russians were Johann Wieler 1883-89, Jacob F. Froese, Adolf Penner 1906-? and Hermann Fast 1892-? Fast was for some time active in St. Petersburg and in Rumania, and after 1901 among the Russians in Canada. The MB Church of Russia established a special fund in 1905 which supported eight Russian evangelists. Some of the Brethren were given prison sentences for disregarding the law against proselyting among the Greek Orthodox; among these were Froese and A. H. Unruh. After the revolution of 1917 work was taken up more freely by tent evangelism (Jacob J. Dyck, 1919), in which a number of Mennonite Brethren were engaged. With few exceptions they were later murdered by the Makhno bandits.

After the establishment of the MB Church in America following the immigration of 1870 and following, MB preachers repeatedly conducted Gospel meetings in the Russian settlements in North Dakota and Saskatchewan, Hermann Fast and John F. Harms serving as evangelists and pastors to the converts. In 1905 the conference published a small Christian periodical, Golos (that is, Voice), with Fast as editor. Congregations were organized at Kief and Dogden, North Dakota, and at Arlee and Blaine Lake, Saskatchewan, which were to some extent affiliated with the MB Conference, but which also held their own conferences. Luke Kravchenko was one of their outstanding ministers. The Board of Foreign Missions of the MB Church has for a number of years supported workers among the Russians of Canada. In 1949 the Canadian Conference was supporting Peter Schroeder at Grand Forks, British Columbia, who worked among the Dukhobors, D. B. Wiens at Arlee, Saskatchewan, and A. Huebert, an itinerant preacher. (See Evangelism.)

[edit] Bibliography

Lohrenz, John H. The Mennonite Brethren Church. Hillsboro, 1950.

Unruh, A. H. Geschichte der Mennoniten-Brüdergemeinde 1860-1954. Hillsboro, 1954.


Author(s) H. H Janzen
Date Published 1959


[edit] Cite This Article

MLA style

Janzen, H. H. "Russian Missions." Global Anabaptist Mennonite Encyclopedia Online. 1959. Web. 2 Oct 2014. http://gameo.org/index.php?title=Russian_Missions&oldid=96327.

APA style

Janzen, H. H. (1959). Russian Missions. Global Anabaptist Mennonite Encyclopedia Online. Retrieved 2 October 2014, from http://gameo.org/index.php?title=Russian_Missions&oldid=96327.




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Adapted by permission of Herald Press, Harrisonburg, Virginia, and Waterloo, Ontario, from Mennonite Encyclopedia, Vol. 4, p. 393. All rights reserved. For information on ordering the encyclopedia visit the Herald Press website.


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