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Matthias Pohl (1869-1934), a Mennonite preacher, born in Emmendingen, Baden, Germany, on 26 March 1869, was a typesetter and proofreader in Langnau in the Emmental, Switzerland, where he also served the Mennonite congregation as preacher. In 1896 he was called as a co-worker on the Zionspilger and wrote several articles for this periodical. He also had some poetic gift and published some of his verse in a small volume, Blumen am Wege.

In 1898 he became editor of the Zionspilger and kept this position until he returned to Germany in 1900. In that year he was elected preacher in Sembach in the Palatinate. His work here was blessed until he retired in 1929. He spent his last years at the Thomashof. As an author he was unusually active, contributing devotional, narrative, and historical articles to the Gemeindeblatt and the Christlicher Gemeindekalender, thereby creating for himself a lasting monument of grateful appreciation. Matthias Pohl died at the Thomashof on 13 May 1934.

Bibliography

Hege, Christian and Christian Neff. Mennonitisches Lexikon. Frankfurt & Weierhof: Hege; Karlsruhe: Schneider, 1913-1967: v. III, 381.

Mennonitischer Gemeinde-Kalender (1935): 54-63.


Author(s) Christian Neff
Samuel Geiser
Date Published


Cite This Article

MLA style

Neff, Christian and Samuel Geiser. "Pohl, Matthias (1869-1934)." Global Anabaptist Mennonite Encyclopedia Online. . Web. 23 Dec 2014. http://gameo.org/index.php?title=Pohl,_Matthias_(1869-1934)&oldid=96085.

APA style

Neff, Christian and Samuel Geiser. (). Pohl, Matthias (1869-1934). Global Anabaptist Mennonite Encyclopedia Online. Retrieved 23 December 2014, from http://gameo.org/index.php?title=Pohl,_Matthias_(1869-1934)&oldid=96085.




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Adapted by permission of Herald Press, Harrisonburg, Virginia, and Waterloo, Ontario, from Mennonite Encyclopedia, Vol. 4, p. 198. All rights reserved. For information on ordering the encyclopedia visit the Herald Press website.


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