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Elizabeth Esau Plett, Mennonite pioneer, was born on 11 April 1893 in Neuanlage (Twin Creek), Manitoba. She was the youngest of seven children born to John Esau (1861-1940) and Maria Unger (1862-1894), immigrants to Canada from Russia during the 1870s.

When Elizabeth was 11 months old her mother died. As a result she was raised by her maternal grandparents Peter H. Unger (1841-1896) and Justina B. Friesen (1836-1905). Twelve-year-old Elizabeth went to live with her Uncle Peter F. Unger (1875-1951) and his family of 12 children when her grandmother died in 1905.

On 10 July 1910 she married David D.K. Plett (1889-1930). Eventually she and her husband settled in Prairie Rose, Manitoba where they farmed and raised their family. They had ten children together. In 1930 Elizabeth lost her 15 year old daughter Katharine, as well as her husband David, during a typhoid fever epidemic. After her husband David died in 1930, Elizabeth continued to farm until 1951 when the farm was taken over by her son Frank.

Like many Mennonite pioneers Elizabeth stood as an example of courage and determination but in addition she left a valuable historical record in the form of a diary which she kept from 1910 until 1957. Elizabeth Esau Plett died on 10 March 1976.

Bibliography

Plett, Harvey G. "Elizabeth Esau Plett 1893-1976." Preservings No. 10 Part I (June 1997): 58-61.


Author(s) Sharon H. H Brown
Date Published June 2006


Cite This Article

MLA style

Brown, Sharon H. H. "Plett, Elizabeth Esau (1893-1976)." Global Anabaptist Mennonite Encyclopedia Online. June 2006. Web. 20 Aug 2014. http://gameo.org/index.php?title=Plett,_Elizabeth_Esau_(1893-1976)&oldid=77043.

APA style

Brown, Sharon H. H. (June 2006). Plett, Elizabeth Esau (1893-1976). Global Anabaptist Mennonite Encyclopedia Online. Retrieved 20 August 2014, from http://gameo.org/index.php?title=Plett,_Elizabeth_Esau_(1893-1976)&oldid=77043.




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