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The Petitcodiac Mennonite congregation began services and formally organized in 1978. Five families are considered the founding leaders of the group. The first building was occupied in 1995. The congregation originated through colonization by individuals from the Nairn Mennonite Church in Ontario.

The congregation was instrumental in establishing Havelock Community Residence, a residential service for mentally handicapped adults, in 1979 under the administration of OPAL Inc.

In 1985 there were 20 members; in 1995, 39; in 2000, 29; The congregation has been affiliated with the Conference of Mennonites in Canada / Mennonite Church Canada (1986), and Mennonite Church Eastern Canada (1988). The language of worship is English.

285 Old Post Rd., Box 58, Petitcodiac, New Brunswick, Canada), E4Z 4N8. (505) 756-2442. Pastor Werner De Jong served in 2002 as a congregational leader.

Bibliography

Records kept at Mennonite Archives of Ontario.

Mennonite Reporter (28 July 1986): 18; (13 November 1989): 13; (16 October 1995): B1; (30 October 1995): 15.

Elliot, Brian. "A Brief History of Petitcodiac Mennonite Church, 1978-1988." unpublished paper, 13 pp., Mennonite Historical Society of Canada coll., Mennonite Archives of Ontario.

Additional Information

Petitcodiac Mennonite Church


Author(s) Sam Steiner
Date Published July 2000


Cite This Article

MLA style

Steiner, Sam. "Petitcodiac Mennonite Church (Petitcodiac, New Brunswick, Canada))." Global Anabaptist Mennonite Encyclopedia Online. July 2000. Web. 28 Aug 2014. http://gameo.org/index.php?title=Petitcodiac_Mennonite_Church_(Petitcodiac,_New_Brunswick,_Canada))&oldid=93290.

APA style

Steiner, Sam. (July 2000). Petitcodiac Mennonite Church (Petitcodiac, New Brunswick, Canada)). Global Anabaptist Mennonite Encyclopedia Online. Retrieved 28 August 2014, from http://gameo.org/index.php?title=Petitcodiac_Mennonite_Church_(Petitcodiac,_New_Brunswick,_Canada))&oldid=93290.




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