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Johannes K. Penner (1850-1926), usually called "Lehrer Penner," was born at Elbing, West Prussia, Germany, on 27 November 1850. He attended the school at Elbing and the private school at Bröskerfeld, where Johannes Claassen was his teacher. In 1867 he was baptized by Johann Töws and became a teacher at Bröskerfeld. In 1860 he attended the normal school at Marienburg and in 1870 emigrated with his mother and brother to the Am Trakt settlement, Saratov, Russia, where he became a teacher. On 4 October 1874, he married Helen Jantzen. In 1875 he was elected minister. In 1880 Penner joined the group that moved to Central Asia to escape military service and meet the Lord. Disillusioned, he joined the group who went to America, and arrived in Beatrice, NE on 19 September 1884, where he taught in a private school and served as minister. His 50th anniversary in teaching was commemorated on 16 June 1917. He died on 8 October 1926.

Bibliography

Andreas, W. C. "Highlights and Sidelights of the Mennonites in Beatrice." Mennonite Life I (July 1946): 22.

"Etwas aus dem Leben Pred. J. K. Penner." Bundesbote-Kalender (1926): 28.


Author(s) Cornelius Krahn
Date Published 1959


Cite This Article

MLA style

Krahn, Cornelius. "Penner, Johannes K. (1850-1926)." Global Anabaptist Mennonite Encyclopedia Online. 1959. Web. 17 Apr 2014. http://gameo.org/index.php?title=Penner,_Johannes_K._(1850-1926)&oldid=76952.

APA style

Krahn, Cornelius. (1959). Penner, Johannes K. (1850-1926). Global Anabaptist Mennonite Encyclopedia Online. Retrieved 17 April 2014, from http://gameo.org/index.php?title=Penner,_Johannes_K._(1850-1926)&oldid=76952.




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Adapted by permission of Herald Press, Harrisonburg, Virginia, and Waterloo, Ontario, from Mennonite Encyclopedia, Vol. 4, p. 13. All rights reserved. For information on ordering the encyclopedia visit the Herald Press website.


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