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Oley Mennonite Church, 1952 Scan courtesy [http://www.mcusa-archives.org/Archives/GuideAMC.html Mennonite Church USA Archives-Goshen] X-31.1, Box 17/32
Oley Mennonite Church (Mennonite Church), located in Oley Valley, Berks County, Pennsylvania, a member of the Ohio and Eastern Mennonite Conference, was the outgrowth of both an agricultural extension and an evangelical outreach from the Conestoga Mennonite Church near Morgantown, Pennsylvania. The first family moved into the valley in 1938, and by 1942 there were 13 families. Sunday-school services were begun in May 1942. On 3 January 1943, Omar Kurtz was ordained as the first pastor. On 18 July 1946, John L. Glick was ordained assistant pastor. For eight years the services were held in a rented union chapel; in September 1950 a new church was dedicated. A number from the community have been received into the church, and from here have gone at least six missionaries. The membership in 1957 was 115, with Ira A. Kurtz of the Conestoga congregation serving as bishop.


Author(s) Omar A Kurtz
Date Published 1959


Cite This Article

MLA style

Kurtz, Omar A. "Oley Mennonite Church (Oley Valley, Berks County, Pennsylvania, USA)." Global Anabaptist Mennonite Encyclopedia Online. 1959. Web. 31 Jul 2014. http://gameo.org/index.php?title=Oley_Mennonite_Church_(Oley_Valley,_Berks_County,_Pennsylvania,_USA)&oldid=93183.

APA style

Kurtz, Omar A. (1959). Oley Mennonite Church (Oley Valley, Berks County, Pennsylvania, USA). Global Anabaptist Mennonite Encyclopedia Online. Retrieved 31 July 2014, from http://gameo.org/index.php?title=Oley_Mennonite_Church_(Oley_Valley,_Berks_County,_Pennsylvania,_USA)&oldid=93183.




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Adapted by permission of Herald Press, Harrisonburg, Virginia, and Waterloo, Ontario, from Mennonite Encyclopedia, Vol. 4, p. 54. All rights reserved. For information on ordering the encyclopedia visit the Herald Press website.


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