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Oak Grove Mennonite Church (Conservative Mennonite Conference), located about five miles west and one-half miles (10 km) south of Adair, Mayes County, Oklahoma, had its beginning as a mission station about 1927, when Monroe Hostetler of Hesston, Kansas, located in the community and conducted a Sunday school in the schoolhouse. Later preaching services were also arranged for and a mission was organized under the South Central Mennonite Conference (MC). Richard Birky (1913-1991) served as the resident pastor 1942-1947. In 1944 a house was remodeled as a church. In the spring of 1957 a new concrete block building was finished and dedicated; this building is located five miles west of Adair on Highway 28. In 1956 the membership was 21, with Richard Birky as pastor again, now also a bishop (ordained 1949).

In 2012 the church was a member of the Conservative Mennonite Conference. Carl Helmuth was the pastor and the membership was 25.

[edit] Additional Information

Address: 6978 W 380 Rd, Adair, OK 74330-3201

Telephone: 918-785-2160

Denominational Affiliation:

Conservative Mennonite Conference


Author(s) Nelson Histand
Richard D. Thiessen
Date Published April 2012


[edit] Cite This Article

MLA style

Histand, Nelson and Richard D. Thiessen. "Oak Grove Mennonite Church (Adair, Mayes County, Oklahoma, USA)." Global Anabaptist Mennonite Encyclopedia Online. April 2012. Web. 2 Jul 2016. http://gameo.org/index.php?title=Oak_Grove_Mennonite_Church_(Adair,_Mayes_County,_Oklahoma,_USA)&oldid=76510.

APA style

Histand, Nelson and Richard D. Thiessen. (April 2012). Oak Grove Mennonite Church (Adair, Mayes County, Oklahoma, USA). Global Anabaptist Mennonite Encyclopedia Online. Retrieved 2 July 2016, from http://gameo.org/index.php?title=Oak_Grove_Mennonite_Church_(Adair,_Mayes_County,_Oklahoma,_USA)&oldid=76510.




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Adapted by permission of Herald Press, Harrisonburg, Virginia, and Kitchener, Ontario, from Mennonite Encyclopedia, Vol. 4, p. 1. All rights reserved.


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